1851 Blunt Nautical Map of The Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, and Albemarle Sound

ChesapeakeBay-blunt-1851
$1,000.00
The Coast of the United States of North America, from New York to St. Augustine drawn and regulated according to the best Surveys and Astronomical Observations by Enmund Blunt.
Processing...

1851 Blunt Nautical Map of The Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, and Albemarle Sound

ChesapeakeBay-blunt-1851

$1,000.00

Title


The Coast of the United States of North America, from New York to St. Augustine drawn and regulated according to the best Surveys and Astronomical Observations by Enmund Blunt.
  1851 (dated)    27 x 38 in (68.58 x 96.52 cm)     1 : 703800

Description


An interesting 1851 Edmund Blunt maritime chart or nautical map of the coast of the United States between New York City and the Pamlico Sound. Centered on the Chesapeake Bay, which is rendered in full, this map offers a fine pre-U.S. Coast Survey analysis of the American coast including the Pamlico Sound, the Albemarle Sound, The Chesapeake Bay and its Rivers, the Delaware Bay, and the New Jersey coastline. The map extends inland as far as Washington D.C. The chart includes numerous depth soundings throughout as well as notes on lighthouse, shoals, and various other undersea dangers. This map appears to have seen considerable use and has numerous pencil markings related to navigation throughout. A scarce map.

Cartographer


Published by E. & G.W. Blunt 179 Water Street, New York. Edmund March Blunt was a bookseller and in Newburyport Massachusetts who sold his merchandise at a bookshop called "The Sign of the Bible". In 1796, along with the nominal assistance of prominent navigator Captain Lawrence Furlong, Blunt published The American Coast Pilot, one of the most important published works on American navigation. Though much of the work was plagiarized from British publications, the "Pilot" was an immediate popular success. In response to the popularity of his work, Blunt published 21 subsequent editions of the "Coast Pilot". The first edition to contain map plates was printed in 1804. After a terrible fire at "The Sign of the Bible" in 1811, Blunt moved his business to New York and published under the "Sign of the Quadrant". In time his son, Edmond Jr. took over the family business and, in 1830, accepted a position under Hassler at the United States Office of the Coast Survey. Much of Blunt's original work eventually found its way into U.S. Coast Survey Publications. Due to the quality and detail of Blunt's work subsequent editions of his most important charts were republished will into the 1880s.

Condition


Average. Map exhibits soiling throughout as well as numerous pencil marking associated with early navigational use. Map has been professionally repaired and backed with archival tissue.