1822 Smith Map of London, England

London-smith-1822
$950.00
Smith's New Plan of London, Westminster and Southwark: Comprehending All the New Buildings and 350 References to the Principal Streets with the New Docks at Wapping and Blackwell.
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1822 Smith Map of London, England

London-smith-1822

Scarce pocket map of London, edition not in Howgego.

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Title


Smith's New Plan of London, Westminster and Southwark: Comprehending All the New Buildings and 350 References to the Principal Streets with the New Docks at Wapping and Blackwell.
  1822 (dated)    16.5 x 29 in (41.91 x 73.66 cm)     1 : 15840

Description


A scarce 1822 dissected pocket map of London, England, by Charles Smith. Centered on the Thames River, this map covers from Paddington to Greenwich and from Chelsea Common to Stratford. The City of London is highlighted in Red and major arteries appear in dark yellow. All major streets, docks, bridges, and important buildings are identified. An index along the lower border identifies all streets in alphabetical order and references a numeric grid system on the map proper. Smith first issued this map in 1801. In 1817 the map was expanded, as seen here, to include the Isle of Dogs and the East India Docks. Howgego sites more than 20 editions to about 1841. The present edition, however, is not included in Howgego, an indicator of its rarity, but fits between Howgego 225.13 and 225.14.

Cartographer


Charles Smith (1768 - 1854) was 19th century British publisher of maps, atlases, and charts, most of which focused on England and London. Smith was appointed mapseller to the Prince of Wales in 1809. His early work stylistically resembles the work of Pinkerton, Cary, and Thomson, though on a much smaller scale. From 1826 to 1854 the business traded as Charles Smith and Son. After Charles Smith's death in 1852 the it was taken over by his son who continued to publish maps well into the 20th century. The younger Smith is best known for his introduction of the 'Tape Indicator Map'. This map, which came with a tape measure, enabled users to triangulate their location based coordinates given in an attached guide. The firm was taken over by George Philip in 1916.

Condition


Very good. Color nicely oxidized. Dissected and mounted on linen in 21 panels. Original linen stable. Folds into its original slipcase.

References


Howgego, James L., Printed Maps of London circa 1553-1850, 255 (this spedific edition not listed)