1844 Black Map of New South Wales, Australia

NewSouthWales-black-1844
$200.00
Part of Australia comprising the settled portions of New South Wales and South Australia.
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1844 Black Map of New South Wales, Australia

NewSouthWales-black-1844

$200.00

Title


Part of Australia comprising the settled portions of New South Wales and South Australia.
  1844 (undated)    11.5 x 16 in (29.21 x 40.64 cm)     1 : 5600000

Description


This is a fine example of Adam and Charles Black's 1844 map of South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. It covers the settled areas of New South Wales and South Australia. Victoria, which became an independent colony separate from New South Wales only in July 1851, is here depicted as part of New South Wales. The interior is relatively unknown though, at this point in history, the coastlines are accurately mapped. Parts of modern day Victoria are identified as 'Australia Felix' (the early name given to the lush green pastures of western Victoria). An inset map in the lower left quadrant details the Norfolk Island, while the lower right quadrant lists the counties in New South Wales. Various cities, towns, rivers, mountains, bays and several other topographical details are noted with relief shown by hachure. This map was engraved by William Hughes and issued as plate no. LVI in the 1844 edition of Black's General Atlas.

CartographerS


Charles and his uncle Adam Black of Edinburgh, Scotland, founded their publishing firm in 1807. They published a series of maps and atlases throughout the 19th century. In addition to an array of atlases, the Black firm is known for their editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica (1817 - 1826) and the first publishing of Sir Walter Scott's novels in 1854. In 1889 the A. & C. Black publishing house moved to London where it remains in operation to this day.



William Hughes (c. 1818 - May 21, 1876) was a cartographer, engraver, lithographer, printer, and publisher active in London during the middle part of the 19th century. Hughes enjoyed and long and varied cartographic career. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in 1838 and, from about 1840, taught geography and mapmaking at St. Johns College for Civil Engineers. He later taught the same at both Queens College and Kings College, London. For a time he was employed as a map librarian for the British Museum. Hughes began engraving maps around 1839 and worked with most of the prominent British map and atlas publishers of his era, including but not limited to Charles Knight, A. and C. Black, George Philip, William Cassell, and others.

Source


Black, A. and C., Black's General Atlas (Edinburgh), 1844.     Black's General Atlas was a popular Scottish atlas of the world issued by the Edinburgh firm of Adam and Charles Black. This atlas was first issued in 1840 with subsequent editions being printed well into the 1890s. While most editions were printed in Edinburgh, an American edition was issued in 1857. Most early editions of his atlas were engraved by S. Hall. Typically this refers to Sidney Hall, who died in 1831, but in this case, since the engraving was initiated well after his death, it was most likely his widow, Selina Hall, who did the engraving. Later editions feature additional maps updated and engraved by William Hughes. Early editions featured outline color only, but later editions embraced a full color approach with pale green, yellow, and blue pastels. All editions are known for their meticulous presentation of the most up-to-date cartographic information. Moreover, this exceptionally long publication run provides a fine cartographic record of the middle to late 19th century - particularly as regards the complex cartographic evolution of the Americas through this period.

Condition


Very good. Original platemark visible. Blank on verso.

References


Philips (atlases) 4334.