William Hole (fl. c. 1601 - 1624) was an English map engraver and metal worker active in the 17th century. Little is known of Hole's life. He may have apprenticed with William Rogers, taught Francis Baker, and was definitely a member of the Goldmsith's Company. He held the posts of "Head Sculptor of the Iron for Money in the Tower and Elsewhere for Life" and was "Graver of the Kings Seals, Ensigns and Arms". Hole's known corpus of maps is small but distinctive. According to the historian Arthur M. Hind,

The Work of William Hole has a peculiar fascination for its individual character, somewhat French in piquant flavour, and for its relation to various poets, writers and musicians, with whom one can image he lived in familiarity.