Daniel Nicholas Chodowiecki (October 16, 1726 - February 7, 1801) was a Polish-German engraver and painter active in Berlin during the second half of the 18th century. Chodowiecki was born in Danzig (Gdansk), Poland of a middle class Huguenot family. When is father passed away Chodowiecki relocated to Berlin, Germany. In 1764 he enrolled in the Berlin Academy where he mastered drawing, engraving, and printmaking. By 1788 he had become Vice-Director of the Academy. He rose in prominence as one of the finest graphic artists of his day, producing a broad corpus of work that ranged from political commentary to literary and scientific illustration. In printmaking, he is credited with the invention of the deliberate remarque, a small sketch on a plate, lying outside the main image. These were originally little sketches or doodles by artists, not really meant to be seen, but Chodowiecki turned them into "bonus items" for collectors. He was exceptionally known for his trade card size miniatures which he issued serially on topic ranging from Shakespeare to the French Revolution. Historically, his most important work is most likely his 12 card set illustrating the events of the American Revolutionary War which rank among the earliest printed images of the war.