1800 George Burn Nautical Chart of the Thames River Entrance, England

ThamesEntrance-laruiewhittle-1800
$1,800.00
A new and correct chart extending from London Bridge to Orford Ness on the Essex and Suffolk coast & from the Nore to the North Foreland, the Downs, and South Foreland on the Kentish coast : comprehending the Swin and King's Channel, with the Wallet, Harwich Harbour, and Horsley Bay, to Aldborough Knapes, also the Five Fathom and South Channels, with the Oaze Deeps, Nubs & Queen's Channel, Kentish Knock &c., &c. By George Burn and several other masters & pilots in the Royal Navy.
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1800 George Burn Nautical Chart of the Thames River Entrance, England

ThamesEntrance-laruiewhittle-1800

Scarce nautical chart illustrating the Thames Entrance and Estuary.
$1,800.00

Title


A new and correct chart extending from London Bridge to Orford Ness on the Essex and Suffolk coast & from the Nore to the North Foreland, the Downs, and South Foreland on the Kentish coast : comprehending the Swin and King's Channel, with the Wallet, Harwich Harbour, and Horsley Bay, to Aldborough Knapes, also the Five Fathom and South Channels, with the Oaze Deeps, Nubs & Queen's Channel, Kentish Knock &c., &c. By George Burn and several other masters & pilots in the Royal Navy.
  1800 (dated)    35.5 x 39 in (90.17 x 99.06 cm)     1 : 5500000

Description


An impressive 1800 George Burn large format nautical chart or maritime map of the entrance to the Thames River, England. The map covers parts of Kent, Essex, and Suffolk. It details the Entrance to the Thames River with its many shoals and coastal communities. S small inset map at the top of the chart continues the map westward from Canvey Island to London, with depth soundings and river towns noted. Throughout there are thousands of depth soundings in fathoms.

The map is dedicated to Lord Viscount Adam Duncan (1731 – 1804). Duncan was a British admiral famous for defeating the Dutch fleet offer Camperton on October 11 of 1797. Duncan was awarded the Large Naval Gold Medal and an annual pension of £3,000, to himself and the next two heirs to his title - this was the biggest pension ever awarded by the British government. Additionally, he was given the freedom of several cities, including Dundee and London. Laurie and Whittle, no doubt sensing a potential patron with influence at the Hydrographic Office, chose this apt map to court his attention.

This map drawn by George Burn, a British Naval officer and was issued as chart 2 in Laurie and Whittle's Channel Pilot published in 1800.

Cartographer


Laurie and Whittle (fl. 1794 - 1858) were London, England, based map and atlas publishers active in the late 18th and early 19th century. Generally considered to be the successors to the Robert Sayer firm, Laurie and Whittle was founded by Robert Laurie (c. 1755 - 1836) and James Whittle (1757-1818). Robert Laurie was a skilled mezzotint engraver and is known to have worked with Robert Sayer on numerous projects. James Whittle was a well-known London socialite and print seller whose Fleet Street shop was a popular haunt for intellectual luminaries. The partnership began taking over the general management of Sayer's firm around 1787; however, they did not alter the Sayer imprint until after Sayer's death in 1794. Apparently Laurie did most of the work in managing the firm and hence his name appeared first in the "Laurie and Whittle" imprint. Together Laurie and Whittle published numerous maps and atlases, often bringing in other important cartographers of the day, including Kitchin, Faden, Jefferys and others to update and modify their existing Sayer plates. Robert Laurie retired in 1812, leaving the day to day management of the firm to his son, Richard Holmes Laurie (1777 - 1858). Under R. H. Laurie and James Whittle, the firm renamed itself "Whittle and Laurie". Whittle himself died in six years later in 1818, and thereafter the firm continued under the imprint of "R. H. Laurie". After R. H. Laurie's death the publishing house and its printing stock came under control of Alexander George Findlay, who had long been associated with Laurie and Whittle. Since, Laurie and Whittle has passed through numerous permeations, with part of the firm still extant as an English publisher of maritime or nautical charts, 'Imray, Laurie, Norie and Wilson Ltd.' The firm remains the oldest surviving chart publisher in Europe.

Source


Stephenson, J., and Burn, G., Laurie and Whittle's Channel Pilot; comprehending the harbors, bays and roads, in the British Channel…, (London: Laurie and Whittle) 1800.    

Condition


Very good. A few minor verso reinforcements and wear on original fold lines. Some transference. Blank on verso.

References


Library of Congress, Map Division, 79696093. OCLC 43216322, 6170751. Maps and Plans in the Public Record Office: I. British Isles, c.1410-1860, (London, 1967), entry 1304.