1817 Dutton Nautical Painting of the British Mail Steam/Sail Ship 'Bonita'

BonitaPainting-dutton-1871
$29,500.00
[Bonita]
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1817 Dutton Nautical Painting of the British Mail Steam/Sail Ship 'Bonita'

BonitaPainting-dutton-1871

Rare painting by one of the greatest mid-19th century British maritime artists.

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Title


[Bonita]
  1871 (dated)    30.5 x 45.5 in (77.47 x 115.57 cm)

Description


A signed and dated nautical oil on canvas painting of a steamboat by Thomas Goldsworth Dutton, considered the greatest English painter of mid-19th century sail/steam powered merchant ships. The painting illustrating the 1,886 ton 300 horsepower British Mail Steamship Bonita in choppy seas. Crew and lifeboats are apparent on deck. There are several additional sailing ships as well a port in the background.

Most of Dutton's oil paintings were preliminary studies for his lithographs and this example is no different. The lithograph resulting from this painting was issued in reduced form on January 25, 1871 and published by N and N. Hanhart. An example of the lithograph is housed at the Greenwich National Maritime Museum in London.

Cartographer


Thomas Goldsworthy Dutton (1820 - 1891) was a 19th-century English marine lithographer, draftsman, painter, and etcher. He was active in London from about 1845 to 1891. Dutton was born in Middlesex, England, the son of an ironmonger. Dutton became known as one of the finest 19th century English lithographers of nautical scenes and ship portraits. He worked for Ackermann to transfer nearly 100 prints to lithographic stone. His work is known for both maritime 'correctness' and attention to detail. Dutton worked out of a studio on Fleet Street in London and his work was frequently exhibited at the Royal Society of British Artists between 1858 and 1879. A near complete collection of Dutton's lithograph work is held at the Greenwich National Maritime Museum.

Condition


Very good. Oil on canvas. Original frame. No apparent restoration.
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