1936 Owens Bird's Eye View of California

California-owens-1936
$300.00
California. / California Official Tourist Picture Map.
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1936 Owens Bird's Eye View of California

California-owens-1936

Bird's eye view of California highlighting all the important sites and landmarks.
$300.00

Title


California. / California Official Tourist Picture Map.
  1936 (dated on verso)    16.5625 x 38 in (42.06875 x 96.52 cm)

Description


This is a c. 1936 Charles Hamilton Owens bird's eye view of California. The map depicts the state from Grants Pass, Oregon to Phoenix, Arizona and Tijuana, Mexico and from Salt Lake City, Utah to the Pacific Ocean. Wonderfully illustrated, cities and towns throughout California and the surrounding states are illustrated and labeled, including Sacramento, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Las Vegas, Yuma, and Flagstaff. The transportation network is highlighted in detail, with major highways and railway lines illustrated and labeled. The Union Pacific, Southern Pacific, Western Pacific, and Santa Fe Railroads are among the labeled railroads. Several national parks, including Yosemite, Sequoia, and Redwood in California, Crater Lake in Oregon, and the Grand Canyon in Arizona are illustrated and labeled as well. Both Mount Whitney (the highest post in the United States at the time) and Death Valley (the lowest point in the United States) are labeled as well. Famous landmarks, such as the Golden Gate Bridge, the Oakland Bay Bridge, the Rose Bowl, and the California State Capital Building are all drawn in profile, adding another level of charm to this lovely piece.

This map was drawn by Charles Hamilton Owens and published by the All-Year Club of Southern California in 1936.

Cartographer


Charles Hamilton Owens (Feb 16, 1881 - March 3, 1958) was an American painter and illustrator and staff illustrator for the Los Angeles Times. Born in San Francisco, he had a passion for drawing from a young age. After landing a job as a messenger for The San Francisco Examiner, Owens began being taught his trade by the newspaper's illustrators. Although it is unclear exactly where Owens started his career as a newspaper staff artist, his reputation was launched by his detailed sketches of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire for a New York paper, using only wire reports and his knowledge of the city. By 1910, Owens was working for the Los Angeles Examiner. Even at this point in his career, Owens was known for experimenting with new forms of illustration, fusing drawings of events with photographs. Owens's map of the Titanic disaster used a high oblique perspective, 'capturing the earth's sphericity and showing the polar regions on a curving horizon.' By the 1920s, Owens reputation as an artist in Los Angeles had grown beyond the realm of journalism. He had a studio and received commissions for landscapes and had exhibited watercolors of California and Hawaii landscapes. Thus, when Owens began creating his war series in April/May 1942, he had all the necessary skills to create visually striking works. The Los Angeles Times began a series of maps for its readers, which were full-page inserts that would appear every Monday and Saturday. Owens's maps would be included in the Monday issues, and a Rand McNally map would be included on Saturdays. The Rand McNally maps, however, were discontinued on June 27, 1942, but Owens's maps continued to be printed. His last war map was published on September 10, 1945, a little over a week after the Japanese surrender. Owens died in Los Angeles on March 3, 1958.

Condition


Good. Wear along original fold lines. Verso repairs to fold separations. Old tape repairs on verso. Highway map of California on verso.
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