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1910 Rand McNally View of Chicago and the Fox River Valley Railroad

ChicagoFoxRiver-randmcnally-1910
$950.00
Panoramic View of the Route of the Aurora, Elgin and Chicago Railway, The Great Thrid-rail Double-track Electrice Railroad between Chicago and the Fox River Valley Connecting at Aurora, Elgin, and Batavia with the lines of the Elgin Aurora and Southern Traction Co. - Main View
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1910 Rand McNally View of Chicago and the Fox River Valley Railroad

ChicagoFoxRiver-randmcnally-1910

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Title


Panoramic View of the Route of the Aurora, Elgin and Chicago Railway, The Great Thrid-rail Double-track Electrice Railroad between Chicago and the Fox River Valley Connecting at Aurora, Elgin, and Batavia with the lines of the Elgin Aurora and Southern Traction Co.
  1910 (undated)     17.75 x 23.25 in (45.085 x 59.055 cm)

Description


A striking c. 1910 Rand McNally chromolithograph view of Chicago and lands west as far as the Fox River. The view illustrates the routes and coverage of the Chicago, Aurora, and Elgin Railroad, Chicagoland's largest Pre-WWI interurban electric railroad. The verso features timetables, a map of the Loop, and promotional material regarding the Fox River Valley's 'unspoiled country' and the 'peaceful valley'.
Chicago, Aurora, and Elgin Railroad
The CAE, known colloquially as the 'Roarin' Elgin' or the 'Great Third Rail' was an interurban electrified passenger railroad running between Chicago's Loop and suburban communities to the west as far as the Fox River Valley. Connections included Elmhurst, Wheaton, and the Fox River towns of Elgin, Batavia, and Aurora, among others. The company was founded in 1899 as several smaller companies, all of which consolidated around 1901 when construction began. Service began in September of 1902, reaching its height, as seen here in 1909-1910. The railroad was hit hard by loss of revenue during World War I and further suffered from the rise of the American automobile industry in the post-war years, leading to bankruptcy in 1919. They nonetheless were able to reorganize, shedding the Fox River Lines (running parallel to the river), and continuing to operate its more lucrative urban and interurban services. But, the decline continued. Within Chicago, CAE services were either replaced by or subsumed into the 'L' system. Service was discontinued entirely in 1857 and the CAE was dissolved in 1961.
Chromolithography
Chromolithography is a color lithographic technique developed in the mid-19th century. The process involved using multiple lithographic stones, one for each color, to yield a rich composite effect. Oftentimes, the process would start with a black basecoat upon which subsequent colors were layered. Some chromolithographs used 30 or more separate lithographic stones to achieve the desired product. Chromolithograph color could also be effectively blended for even more dramatic results. The process became extremely popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when it emerged as the dominate method of color printing. The vivid color chromolithography produced made it exceptionally effective for advertising and propaganda imagery.
Publication History and Census
This view was first published by Rand McNally for the Chicago, Aurora, and Elgin Railroad in 1909 for the G.A.R. (Grand Army of the Republic) meeting in Aurora. The present example exhibits update on the Elgin route that suggest this must have been issued a year later, in 1910. The view is rare. We are aware of only 2 surviving examples, this being the better.

Cartographer


Rand, McNally and Co. (fl. 1856 - present) is an American publisher of maps, atlases and globes. The company was founded in 1856 when William H. Rand, a native of Quincy, Massachusetts, opened a print shop in Chicago. Rand hired the recent Irish immigrant Andrew McNally to assist in the shop giving him a wage of 9 USD per week. The duo landed several important contracts, including the Tribune's (later renamed the Chicago Tribune) printing operation. In 1872, Rand McNally produced its first map, a railroad guide, using a new cost effective printing technique known as wax process engraving. As Chicago developed as a railway hub, the Rand firm, now incorporated as Rand McNally, began producing a wide array of railroad maps and guides. Over time, the firm expanded into atlases, globes, educational material, and general literature. By embracing the wax engraving process, Rand McNally was able to dominate the map and atlas market, pushing more traditional American lithographic publishers like Colton, Johnson, and Mitchell out of business. Eventually Rand McNally opened an annex office in New York City headed by Caleb S. Hammond, whose name is today synonymous with maps and atlases, and who later started his own map company, C. S. Hammond & Co. Both firms remain in business. Learn More...

Condition


Good. Minor verso repairs at a couple of fold intersections and to margins.