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1763 Janvier Chart of Four Celestial Spheres or Globes

FourSpheres-janvier-1763
$500.00
Sphere de Copernic. Sphere de Ptolemée. Globe Terrestre. Globe Celeste. - Main View
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1763 Janvier Chart of Four Celestial Spheres or Globes

FourSpheres-janvier-1763

Illustrates the Ptolemaic and Copernican models of the solar system and the Earth and the constellations.

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Title


Sphere de Copernic. Sphere de Ptolemée. Globe Terrestre. Globe Celeste.
  1763 (undated)     12.25 x 19 in (31.115 x 48.26 cm)

Description


This is a 1763 Jean Janvier chart of four celestial spheres or globes. Each of the four instruments present a different astronomical phenomenon. The first, on the far left, illustrates the Copernican model of the solar system, while the one on its right depicts the Ptolemaic model. Each is composed of different celestial bodies, although the Copernican model includes more planets than the Ptolemaic one. The two globes on the right appear to be much more familiar, as one is a globe of the Earth and illustrates the Eastern Hemisphere, while the other is a celestial globe decorated by constellations.

This chart was produced by Jean Janvier in 1763.

Cartographer


Jean or Robert Janvier (fl. 1746 - 1776) was a Paris based cartographer active in the mid to late 18th century. Janvier true first name is a matter of debate, as it appears as it often appears as either Jean or Robert. More commonly, Janvier simply signed his maps Signor Janvier. By the late 18th century Janvier seems to have been awarded the title of "Geographe Avec Privilege du Roi" and this designations appears on many of his latter maps. Janvier worked with many of the most prominent French, English and Italian map publishers of his day, including Faden, Lattre, Bonne, Santini, Zannoni, Delamarche, and Desnos. Learn More...

Condition


Good. Wear and toning along original centerfold. Blank on verso.