1921 Crow City Map or Plan of City of Victoria, Hong Kong

HongKong-crow-1921
$400.00
Plan of Hong Kong. City of Victoria. Drawn for Crow's 'Handbook for China.'
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1921 Crow City Map or Plan of City of Victoria, Hong Kong

HongKong-crow-1921

Intriguing city map or plan of Victoria, Hong Kong, the de facto capital during the British colonial period.
$400.00

Title


Plan of Hong Kong. City of Victoria. Drawn for Crow's 'Handbook for China.'
  1921 (undated)    6 x 11 in (15.24 x 27.94 cm)     1 : 7040

Description


This is a 1921 Carl Crow city map or plan of Victoria, Hong Kong. The map depicts Victoria from Kennedy Road, Bowen Road, and the Navy Yard to Hollywood Road and the Western Market and from the public gardens and Robinson Road to Connaught Road and the port. All the streets are labeled, as well as several cathedrals, churches, and colleges. The government house is labeled in big block lettering. The Peak Tramway, which scales Victoria Peak, is depicted on the left side of the map, along with the tram station. Victoria was the de facto capital of Hong Kong during the British colonial period. Per Crow, 'outside of official documents one rarely hears the name Victoria, the city being commonly given the name of the island,' Hong Kong.

This map was published by Carl Crow in his Handbook for China in 1921.

Cartographer


Carl Crow (1884 - 1945) was a born in Missouri and is known for, among several achievements, opening the first Western advertising agency in Shanghai, China. Crow arrived in Shanghai in 1911, where he lived for 25 years. He worked as a journalist, newspaper proprietor, and advertising agent, while also spending time as a hostage negotiator, police sergeant, farmer, and a liaison for the U.S. government. He was also a celebrated author whose book, 400 Million Customers, won several awards when it came out in the 1930s and has been reprinted at least twice during the 21st century. During his time in China he met and interviewed most of the major figures of the day, including Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong's second-in-command Zhou En-lai. Fearing retribution because of his anti-Japanese sentiments, he left Shanghai in 1937, only a couple of days after the Japanese attacked during the Second Sino-Japanese War. He worked for American intelligence during the Second World War and became one of the first westerners to journey up the Burma Road. He died in Manhattan in 1945.

Source


Crow, C. The Travelers' Handbook for China (including Hong Kong) 3rd Edition (Shanghai: Carl Crow) 1921.    

Condition


Very good. Wear along origina fold lines. Light toning. Blank on verso.

References


OCLC 911964178.