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1913 Wellge / Cox Bird's-Eye View of the Keweenaw Peninsula, Upper Peninsula, Michigan

KeweenawPeninsula-wellge-1913
$1,475.00
Panoramic View of the Keweenaw Peninsula, The Great Copper Country of Northern Michigan Population near 100,000, including the towns of Houghton, Hancock, Calumet, Lake Linden, Etc. - Main View
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1913 Wellge / Cox Bird's-Eye View of the Keweenaw Peninsula, Upper Peninsula, Michigan

KeweenawPeninsula-wellge-1913

Copper Boom on the Keweenaw! Wellge's last work!

Title


Panoramic View of the Keweenaw Peninsula, The Great Copper Country of Northern Michigan Population near 100,000, including the towns of Houghton, Hancock, Calumet, Lake Linden, Etc.
  1913 (dated)     12.75 x 28 in (32.385 x 71.12 cm)

Description


One of only 3 surviving examples of the rare Henry Wellge 1913 bird's-eye view of the Keweenaw Peninsula, Upper Peninsula, Michigan, at the height of the early 20th century copper mining boom. The view looks northeast along the peninsula from a fictive highpoint above Houghton and Portage Lake. Towns are labeled and important buildings noted, including the industrial smelting operations along Torch Lake and Bay. This view was issued by Albert Kennedy Houghton, a bookshop owner in Houghton, shortly before he left town for Minneapolis.
Wellge's Last View?
It is of note that this is most likely Henry Wellge's last work. It postdates his last work noted in Reps by 3 years and is not itself noted in American Views and Viewmakers.
Copper in Keweenaw
The Keweenaw Peninsula is the northernmost part of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Today, Keweenaw is known as a vacation destination admired for its rugged beauty. From the mid-19th century to about 1913 it was the center of a vibrant copper mining industry - leading to nearly 50 years of boomtime. Copper was known in Keweenaw from the 17th century but the extent of copper deposits was unknown until 1841, when state geologist Douglass Houghton made a detailed study of the region. When the rich copper deposits were discovered, Congress moved quickly to purchase the peninsula from the indigenous Chippewa. A speculation craze followed, with mining leases reaching top dollar as investors from Chicago, Boston, and New York drove prices skyward. Mining operations ensued, leading to a population boom and international immigration from across Europe. Mining companies consolidated, transforming into huge conglomerates. Copper production began to decline around the time this map was made, in 1913, when the Michigan Copper Strike (1913 - 1914) ground operations to a halt. While things briefly recovered, mining was hit hard by the devaluation of copper during the Great Depression and ceased entirely by 1968.
Publication History and Census
This view was drawn by Henry Wellge and published by Albert Kennedy Houghton in 1913. We note only 2 other surviving examples, one at the Library of Congress and a second at Central Michigan University. All bear the Cox imprint, and all are photomechanical prints - as was common with views issued after 1909 or so. This is the only known example of this view to have entered the private market.

CartographerS


Henry Wellge (1850 – 1923) was an American panoramic bird's-eye view publisher, artist, and cartographer active in Milwaukee in the late 19th and early 20th century. Wellge was born in Germany in 1850. His first view, in 1878, was of Chilton Wisconsin, but most of his early work is in association with J. J. Stoner, another prolific view maker. Eventually established his own firm Henry Wellge and Company. Later his published and Norris, Wellge and Company. Ultimately though, most of his work appears under the imprint of the American Publishing Company. He continued to publish views until about 1910 with about 152 views bearing his imprint. Wellge is known for large dramatic views illustrated with emphasis on the horizontal dimension. Learn More...


Albert Kennedy Cox (July 11, 1874 - April 24, 1856) was a Canadian-American publisher, stationer, and bookseller active in Houghton, Michigan. Cox was born in Huron, Ontario. He was working in Ontario as Dry Good Clerk before emigrating to the United States in 1892. He moved to Houghton, Michigan, in 1906 to become the manager of the Houghton Office of the Western Express. Houghton was then the heart of the vibrant Keweenaw Peninsula Upper Peninsula mining industry. He established a music and bookshop on Isle Royale Street around 1909. In 1910, he relocated with a 3-year lease to larger premises on 162 Shelden, Houghton. Throughout he entire time in Houghton, Cox was deeply involved with music and booked regular theater and musical spectacles. When his lease at 162 Shelden expired in 1913, he sold the business to James McRae. Cox moved Minnesota, where he opened a music shop and, with financial backers, managed regional musical performances. He remained in the Minneapolis area through the 1930s. He relocated again, to Wheeling, West Virginia, where he died in 1956. He was married to Ella May Jamieson (1874 - 1955). Learn More...

Condition


Very good. A few minor margin repairs. Minor water stain upper right.

References


OCLC 7732006. Library of Congresss, G4112.K4A35 1913.