1904 Japanese Map of Korea and China issued during the Russo-Japanese War

KoreaChina-japanese-1904
$1,500.00
日露戰闘地圖 / Rì lù zhàn dòu dìtú. / Map of the Russo-Japanese War.
Processing...

1904 Japanese Map of Korea and China issued during the Russo-Japanese War

KoreaChina-japanese-1904

Important map illustrating the opening of the Russo-Japanese War.
$1,500.00

Title


日露戰闘地圖 / Rì lù zhàn dòu dìtú. / Map of the Russo-Japanese War.
  1904 (dated)    41 x 30 in (104.14 x 76.2 cm)     1 : 1900000

Description


A scarce 1904 or Meiji 37 map illustrating the early days of the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905), including the Japanese invasion of China and Korea, and the conflict that ensued with Russia. The map covers all of Korea, the Yellow Sea, Shandong China, including Qingdao, and Liaoning, including Dalian. It extends north to include the Russian port of Vladivostok. The Russo-Japanese War was fought between the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over rival imperial ambitions in Manchuria and Korea. The major theatres of operations were the Liaodong Peninsula and Mukden in Southern Manchuria and the seas around Korea, Japan and the Yellow Sea. Appropriately, the map covers these theaters illustrating the successful Japanese attacks on Port Arthur (Lüshun City) and Vladivostok, Russia's only useful Asian ports. It also illustrates Japanese aggression in the Liaodong Peninsula and Mukden, marking some of Japan's initial successful imperial forays.
Russo-Japanese War
The Russo-Japanese War, fought from February 8, 1904 - September 5, 1905, pitted Imperial Japan against Tsarist Russia over rival imperial ambitions in Manchuria and Korea. Both Russia and Japan had grand visions for the region. Russia traditionally had only one Pacific port, Vladivostok, which was operational only during the warm summer months. In 1898, Russia coerced China, then weakened after the First Sino-Japanese War (1894 - 1895), to lease Port Arthur, a warm water port on the Liaodang Peninsula. They also negotiated a right-of-way to connect Port Arthur to the China Eastern Railway, which ran from nearby Dalian (Dalny) to Harbin, a stop on the Siberian Railway. Russia, eager to expand southwards from Siberia, considered Port Arthur the cornerstone of a sphere of influence covering China, Manchuria, and Korea. Japan had its own Imperial ambitions and saw itself as the natural overlord in East Asia. Korea and Manchuria in particular were important as steppingstones into China, with its seemly unlimited resources.

There was initially some attempt at negotiation between the imperialist powers, but Tsar Nicholas II arrogantly believed it impossible that Japan could challenge a major European power. Japan proved him wrong, launching a surprise attack on the Russian Eastern Fleet stationed at Port Arthur. Throughout the course of the war, the Russians were defeated again and again, humiliating the Tsar and forcing U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt to arbitrate a peace, confirmed by the Treaty of Portsmouth. The treaty recognized Japan's claims on Korea and called for the evacuation of Russian forces from Manchuria, including from Port Arthur.

The overwhelming victory of Imperial Japan came as a surprise to international observers, being the first major military victory in the modern era of an Asian over European power. The consequences transformed the balance of power, confirmed Japan as the pre-eminent power in East Asia.

Condition


Very good. Minor repairs and reinforcements along original fold lines and along some edges. Comes with original slipcase. Two sheets, joined by publisher.
Looking for a high-resolution scan of this?