1845 Andrew Gray Map of Western Lake Superior

LakeSuperior-gray-1845
$1,400.00
Map of that Part of the Mineral Lands adjacent to Lake Superior, ceded to the United States by the Treaty of 1842 with the Chippewas.  Comprising that District lying between Chocolate River and Fond du Lac, under the superintendency of Genl. John Stockton, U.S. Agent.
Processing...

1845 Andrew Gray Map of Western Lake Superior

LakeSuperior-gray-1845

Scarce map illustrating original survey work of the Mineral Districts around Lake Superior.
$1,400.00

Title


Map of that Part of the Mineral Lands adjacent to Lake Superior, ceded to the United States by the Treaty of 1842 with the Chippewas. Comprising that District lying between Chocolate River and Fond du Lac, under the superintendency of Genl. John Stockton, U.S. Agent.
  1845 (dated)    36 x 46 in (91.44 x 116.84 cm)     1 : 380000

Description


A rarely seen and massive 1845 government issued map of the western part of Lake Superior drawn to illustrate mining districts. The map covers from Cass Bay and Grand Island westward as far as the American Fur Company Depot at the mouth of the River St. Louis, or modern day Duluth. Cartographically the map is an original production based upon first hand survey work conducted by Andrew Belcher Gray, George Talcott, and John Seib. For those areas not directly surveyed, they relied on the excellent 1843 map of the Upper Mississippi drawn by Joseph Nicolas Nicollet, as wel as maps by Douglass Houghton and William Austin Burt. The map was the finest representation of Lake Superior then available, with exceptional detail on the Keweenaw Peninsula, Isle Royale, and Talcott Harbor. An illustration in the lower right shows their rustic base, Camp Gray, with log lean-tos, tents, teepees, canoes, drying fish, and a couple of sail boats. Mineral tracts are located and numbered, with leased tracts indicated by hand coloring. The locations of the American Fur Company Posts and Catholic/Methodist Missions are noted. A large inset in the upper right details all of Lake Superior as well as parts of Lake Michigan.

Printed by B. Graham Lithographer, of Washington D.C. The map accompanied a government report issued by the War Department for the 1st Session of the 29th Congress, 1846. The report is entitled Doc. No. 211: Mineral Lands on Lake Superior and accompanies this map.

CartographerS


Andrew Belcher Gray (July 6, 1820–April 16, 1862) was an American surveyor active in the 20 years prior to the American Civil War. Gray was born in Norfolk Virginia. He studied surveying under Andrew Talcott and assisted him in 1839 surveying the Mississippi River Delta. He then joined the Republic of Texas Navy as a midshipman. He was assigned to survey the Texas –U.S. boundary under Memucan Hunt. Later, from 1844 – 1846 he led a team surveying the Keweenaw Peninsula in Michigan in search of mineral resources. Gray returned to Texas to take part in the Mexican-American War and after the war was assigned to the U.S.-Mexican Border Commission. After a dispute with is commander, John Bartlett, he was dismissed form the commission only to be replaced by his friend, William Emory. Although Emory's name is on the work, Gray surveyed much of the border from the Rio Grande, over the Black Range, down the Gila River to its junction with the Colorado River, and across the desert of southern California to the Pacific Ocean at San Diego. Having accompanied the border commission as far as San Diego Bay, Gray took part in the founding of modern San Diego, California. In 1852 he took work with the Texas Western Railroad and surveyed tracks from San Antonio towards the Colorado River. With the outbreak of the American Civil War, Gray joined the Confederate Army and worked as an engineer fortifying the Mississippi River. He died in 1862 1862 when the boiler of a steamboat he was traveling on exploded. He was survived by a wife and three daughters.


George Talcott (December 6, 1786 – April 25, 1862) was an American surveyor and military officer active during the first half of the 19th century. Talcott was born into a Connecticut farming family. He joined the U.S. Army with a rank of Second Lieutenant in 1813. Talcott was transferred to the Ordnance Corps, where he rose rapidly through the ranks. Talcott was an able officer but twice ran afoul of his superiors. The first time occurred when he had a deserter under his command horsewhipped, a punishment Talcott considered a mercy. He was nonetheless brought up on charges of having cruelly abused a prisoner. These charges were dismissed much to the consternation of his superior officer. Despite a narrowly avoided court martial, Talcott continued to rise through the ranks becoming, in 1848 Chief of the Ordnance and, shortly thereafter, Brevet Brigadier General. In 1851 Talcott again fell out with his superiors, this time the Secretary of War Charles Magill Conrad (December 24, 1804 – February 11, 1878). With the Civil War brewing and hostilities increasing between the northern and southern states, Conrad took offense that Talcott awarded a munitions contract to a southern supplier. This second court martial resulted in Talcott being dismissed from his post and from the Army itself. Talcott died 10 years later on April 25 of 1862. George Talcott should not be confused with Andrew Talcott, an unrelated American military surveyor active during the same period.

Source


Doc. No. 211: Mineral Lands on Lake Superior, War Department, 1846.    

Condition


Good. Backed on archival tissue. The map is compiled from two large sheets somewhat ill-joined at the center by the publisher. It has been flattened and backed on archival tissue, but retains numerous minor creases. Light foxing

References


Boston Public Library, Leventhal Center, G4112.U6H1 1845. OCLC 263694091.