1943 Chapin Map of Europe with Possible Allied Invasion Routes

RoutesToBerlin-chapin-1943
$375.00
Routes to Berlin. - Main View
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1943 Chapin Map of Europe with Possible Allied Invasion Routes

RoutesToBerlin-chapin-1943

Possible Allied invasion routes to Berlin.
$375.00

Title


Routes to Berlin.
  1943 (dated)     44.75 x 33.5 in (113.665 x 85.09 cm)     1 : 4224000

Description


This is a large, separately issued 1943 Robert M. Chapin, Jr. map Europe. Created for TIME, the map illustrates four possible Allied invasion strategies proposed by Colonel Conrad H. Lanza, U.S. Army (ret.) (1878 - 1963) in an article published in the June 1943 issue of the Field Artillery Journal. In this article, Colonel Lanza discussed potential Allied invasion points around continental Europe, although he did not attempt to predict where or when an invasion would take place. Each of Lanza's plans focused on the central Allied objective - capturing Berlin. Here, Chapin and TIME detail four of his proposed possibilities. The first involved an invasion of Norway between Oslo and Kristiansand, which would also necessitate landings on the western and northern Norwegian coasts are diversions. The Allies would then have a shorter distance to travel between Norway and Berlin but would have to combat large concentrations of enemy soldiers in a relatively small geographic area. This plan would also force the Allies to forcibly liberate Copenhagen, which would be a difficult task to say the least. Possible landings in Belgium and the Netherlands were also included by Chapin in this first possibility. Lanza's second proposal illustrated here involved invading southwestern France along the Spanish border from the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts nearly simultaneously. The third option took advantage of Allied positions in Sicily, Sardinia, and Corsica to land troops in the northern Adriatic. Lanza proposed this option, it appears, because western Italy's terrain (the Alps and several major rivers) made invading Germany from there much more difficult. The final option depicted here is an Allied invasion of the continent through the Aegean Sea and Greece. Lanza pointed to the difficulties presented by German-held islands in the Aegean alongside the distances involved (on the order of 950 miles) and implied that this strategy was unlikely.
Publication History and Census
This map was drawn by Robert M. Chapin, Jr. for TIME to accompany an article published in the June 21, 1943 issue. The present example is a separately issued enlargement. Five examples are cataloged in OCLC and are part of the institutional collections at Central Connecticut State University, Franklin and Marshall College, the University of Michigan, Wichita State University, and Stanford University. An example is also part of the David Rumsey Collection.

Cartographer


Robert M. Chapin Jr. (fl. 1933 - 1970) was a prominent architect, cartographer and illustrator active during World War II and the Cold War. Chapin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1933 with a degree in architecture. Since this was the height of the Great Depression, and architects in low demand, he instead took work as a staff cartographer at Newsweek. Catching the attention of Manfred Gottfried of Time, Chapin was offered an accepted a position at the head of Time's cartography department. He remained with Time for some 33 years, from 1937 to 1970, often drawn 2 - 3 new thematic maps weekly. With an architect's gift visualizing information, Chapin became a skilled informational cartographer, heading the cartography department at Time Magazine. Chapin, like Fortune Magazine chief cartographer, Richard Edes Harrison, Chapin was at the forefront of infographic propaganda cartography, a genre that matured during the World War II Era and remains popular today. Working for Time Magazine, Chapin developed a signature style for his long run of 'War Maps.' Chapin was known for his maverick airbrush technique which lead to strong color splashes and intense shading. He also incorporated celluloid stencils to illustrate bomb explosions, flags, sinking ships, and more - generating a instantly recognizable standardized style. Chapin's Time war maps were further distinctive for their use of strong bold reds as a universal symbol of hostility. Chapin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1933 with a degree in architecture. Since this was the height of the Great Depression, an d architects in low demand, he instead took work as a staff cartographer at Newsweek. Catching the attention of Manfred Gottfried of Time, Chapin was offered an accepted a position at the head of Time's cartography department. He remained with Time for some 33 years, from 1937 to 1970, often drawn 2 - 3 new thematic maps weekly. Chapin live in Sharon Connecticut.

Condition


Very good. Exhibits light wear along original fold lines. Verso repair at one fold intersection. Blank on verso.

References


Rumsey 11769.000. OCLC 48120753.