1817 Thomson Map of Poland and Lithuania

Poland-thomson-1817
$350.00
Poland As Divided.
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1817 Thomson Map of Poland and Lithuania

Poland-thomson-1817

Shows the 'Fourth Partition of Poland' following the Napoleonic Wars.

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Title


Poland As Divided.
  1817 (undated)    18 x 20 in (45.72 x 50.8 cm)

Description


This is an exceptionally fine example of John Thomson's 1817 map of Poland. Thomson's map covers Poland following Napoleonic Wars and the treaties of the 1815 Congress of Vienna. Twenty earlier, in 1795 The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was dismembered and divided between Russia, Prussia, and Austria. During Napoleon's brief period of hegemony in the region he resurrected Poland and Polish hopes for solidarity in the form of the Duchy of Warsaw. Following Napoleon's defeat at the Battle of Waterloo, the Victoria powers repartitioned Poland roughly along the lines of the 1785 Third Partition. This event is often referred to as the 'Fourth Partition of Poland' and reflects the borders presented here. Color coding identifies the powers that controlled each part of Poland with yellow representing Russia, Austrian claims in red, and German dominions in blue. Relief is shown by hachure with towns, cities, and major topographical features identified. This map is a steel plate engraving by J. and G. Menzies and was prepared by John Thomson for inclusion in the 1817 edition of Thomson's New General Atlas.

Cartographer


John Thomson was one of the leading masters of the Edinburgh school of cartography which flourished from roughly 1800 to 1830. Thomson & his contemporaries (Pinkerton & Cary) redefined European cartography by abandoning typical 18th century decorative elements such as elaborate title cartouches and fantastic beasts in favor of detail and accuracy. Thomson's principle works include the "Thomson's New General Atlas" published from 1814 to 1827 and his "Atlas of Scotland". The "Atlas of Scotland", a work of groundbreaking detail and dedication would eventually bankrupt the Thomson firm in 1830. Today Thomson maps are becoming increasingly rare as they are highly admired for their monumental size, vivid hand coloration, and superb detail.

Source


Thomson, J. A New General Atlas, (Edinburgh) 1817.    

Condition


Very good condition. Original centerfold exhibits some light toning and archival verso reinforcement. Light soiling to outer margins. Some offsetting or transference. Original platemark visible. Blank on verso.

References


Rumsey 1007.033. Malinowski, H., The Malinowski collection of Poland, 459. Phillips (Atlases) 731. Newberry Library: Ayer 135 T4 1817.