1732 Danet Separate-Issue Map of Asia

Asie-danet-1732
$2,000.00
L'Asie Dressée sur de Nouveaux Mémoires Assujettis aux Observations Astronomique.
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1732 Danet Separate-Issue Map of Asia

Asie-danet-1732

Rare separate issue map of Asia with interesting Kamtschatka content.
$2,000.00

Title


L'Asie Dressée sur de Nouveaux Mémoires Assujettis aux Observations Astronomique.
  1732 (dated)    19.75 x 28.5 in (50.165 x 72.39 cm)     1 : 24000000

Description


A highly decorative separate issue map of 1732 Asia issued by Guillaume Danet. The map is distinctively striking with a scallop shells and armorial shield border and elaborate decorative cartouche. Cartographically the map was derived from Guillaume De L'Isle (1675 – 1726) revised 1720 map of Asia. Coverage extends from the Mediterranean to the Philippines and from Nova Zembla to Java.

Danet's map is particularly interesting for its presentation of Kamchatka, which draws from the 1730 map of Philipp Johann Strahlenberg, which itself is based upon his own travels augmented by Abu Al-Ghazi Bahadur's Genealogical History of the Tartars. Although Kamchatka remains attached to Hokkaido, here identified as Yesso, the map does name Russian colonies in the region and describe several indigenous kingdoms. Just off the coast of Kamchatka there are several speculative island groups, including Terre da la Compagnie, a mismapping of the Japanese Kuril Islands Kunashir and Iturup (Terre de la Compagnie) based upon the 1643 explorations of Dutch navigators Maerten de Vries and Cornelis Jansz Coen.

This map was a part of a series of continent maps engraved for Danet, possibly by Jan L'Huilier. Some of the maps in that series are signed by one J. Luillier. While the present Asia map is not signed by Luillier, where his imprint would have been situated based upon other maps in the series, just above Danet's name in the cartouche, some text has been scratched out.

Most likely Luiller is a reference to Jan or Joannes L'Huilier, a 17th and early 18th century French engraver. Some of the maps in this series are conventionally dated to 1731, but all examples we have identified have dates of 1732, suggesting that the 1731 date may be nothing more than an oft-repeated error. It is conceivable that L'Huilier or Luillier issued this map on his own account before publishing them under Danet's imprint, but if so no such examples have been found.

After Danet's widow Marguerite-Geneviève died in 1746, the plates for this map series were acquired by Louis Charles Desnos who completed a major revision and issued editions in 1760, 1766 and 1774. Danet was not a prolific cartographer and his works are rare, especially, as here, independent issue maps.

Cartographer


Guillaume Danet (1670 – 1732) was a Paris based French bookseller and map publisher active in the late 17th and early 18th century. Danet married Marguerite-Geneviève De Fer becoming the son-in-law of the cartographer and map publisher Nicolas De Fer (1626 – 1720). Along with his brothers and brothers-in-law, Jacques-François Bénard (Besnard) Danet (husband of Marie-Anne De Fer and engraver to the King of Spain) and Remi Richer (an engraver who sold portion of the De Fer business to his brothers in 1721), Guillaume Danet inherited a portion Nicolas De Fer's publishing business in 1720. Both Danet and Bénard used the De Fer name and signage concurrently. Danet maintained a book and map shop on the Pont Notre-Dame. After Danet's own death in 1732, the business was continued by his widow, Marguerite-Geneviève, until about 1746. Marguerite-Geneviève died in 1746 after which many of the De Fer / Danet plates were acquired by Louis Charles Desnos.

Condition


Average. Vivid color. The map exhibits several repaired tears, margin repairs, and partial margin reinstatement. Overall stabilized.
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