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1891 Kurz and Allison View of the Civil War Battle of Stone River, Tennessee

BattleStoneRiver-kurzallison-1891
$650.00
Battle of Stone River. Near Murfreesborough, Tenn. - Main View
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1891 Kurz and Allison View of the Civil War Battle of Stone River, Tennessee

BattleStoneRiver-kurzallison-1891

The highest overall percentage of casualties of any American Civil War battle.

SOLD

Title


Battle of Stone River. Near Murfreesborough, Tenn.
  1891 (dated)     22 x 28.25 in (55.88 x 71.755 cm)

Description


This is an 1891 Kurz and Allison chromolithograph view of the American Civil War Battle of Stones River. Kurz and Allison present a stylized view of the battle, with Union Major General Rosecrans in the foreground on the left. With Union troops on the left and Confederate soldiers are on the right, Kurz and Allison correctly depict the fighting on both sides of the Stones River. The several cannons on the Union side likely allude to the critical role of Union artillery in repulsing two Confederate attacks on January 2. The field is littered with casualties, a reference to the battle's high human cost.
A Most Costly Engagement
Fought between December 31, 1862, and January 2, 1863, the Battle of Stones River saw the highest overall percentage of total casualties of any Civil War battle, including Shiloh and Antietam. 78,400 men, from both the Union and Confederate armies, fought, and 24,645 were either killed, wounded, or missing when the fighting ceased - nearly 1/3 of all forces in the engagement. Four brigadier generals, two Confederate and two Union, were killed or mortally wounded during the battle, and Frances Elizabeth Quinn, a woman, fighting as a man in the Union army, was among those wounded.
Kurz and Allison Civil War Lithographs
The publishing firm Kurz and Allison created a series of thirty-six battle scenes from the American Civil War in the late 1880s and early 1890s, of which this view is one. At the time of their publication, remembrance of the Civil War was at an all-time high. Kurz and Allison wanted to capitalize on this sentiment. Although the Kurz and Allison views were not the first Civil War battle views to be published, they were by far the most popular. In a style reminiscent of Currier and Ives, Kurz and Allison lithographs were not meant to be historical representations, and even, from time to time, included historical inaccuracies. Even so, 'prints depicting the Civil War battles by Kurz and Allison are among the most sought-after collectibles of Civil War enthusiasts.'
Chromolithography
Chromolithography is a color lithographic technique developed in the mid-19th century. The process involved using multiple lithographic stones, one for each color, to yield a rich composite effect. Frequently, the process would start with a black basecoat upon which subsequent colors were layered. Some chromolithographs used 30 or more separate lithographic stones to achieve the desired effect. Chromolithograph color could also be effectively blended for even more dramatic results. The process became extremely popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries when it emerged as the dominant method of color printing. The vivid color chromolithography produced made it exceptionally effective for advertising and propaganda imagery.
Publication History and Census
This view was created and published by Kurz and Allison in 1891. This view is not cataloged in OCLC, but we have located examples in the collections of the Tennessee State Library and Archives and the Kentucky Historical Society.

Cartographer


Kurz and Allison (1880 - c. 1905) was an American publishing firm known for its chromolithographs. Founded by Louis Kurz (1835 - 1921) and Alexander Allison, the firm was based at 267-269 Wabash Avenue in Chicago. In the partnership, it is known that Kurz, an Austrian immigrant, was the lithographer and it is presumed that Allison provided the financial backing. The firm is most well-known for its series of thirty-six battle scenes from the American Civil War. At the time of their publication, the late 1880s and early 1890s, a general nostalgia was prevalent among Civil War veterans (of which Kurz was one), and evidently the company was trying to capitalize on the sentiment. Kurz and Allison's Civil War prints were not the first such prints to be issued, but they were by far the most popular. In a style reminiscent of Currier and Ives, Kurz and Allison lithographs are not meant to be historical representations, and even, from time to time, included historical inaccuracies. Even so, 'prints depicting the Civil War battles by Kurz and Allison are among the most sought-after collectibles of Civil War enthusiasts.' Their prints are also notable for featuring African-American soldiers, a rarity for the era. After the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, the firm published views from famous battles and continued doing so for the campaigns of the Philippine-American War and the Russo-Japanese War. Learn More...

Condition


Very good.

References


Tennessee State Library and Archives 31937. Kentucky Historical Society 1976.58.07.