Kurz and Allison (1880 - c. 1905) was an American publishing firm known for its chromolithographs. Founded by Louis Kurz (1835 - 1921) and Alexander Allison, the firm was based at 267-269 Wabash Avenue in Chicago. In the partnership, it is known that Kurz, an Austrian immigrant, was the lithographer and it is presumed that Allison provided the financial backing. The firm is most well-known for its series of thirty-six battles scenes from the American Civil War. At the time of their publication, the late 1880s and early 1890s, a general remembrance was prevalent among Civil War veterans (of which Kurz was one), and evidently the company was trying to capitalize on the sentiment. Kurz and Allison's Civil War prints were not the first such prints to be issued, but they were by far the most popular. In a style reminiscent of Currier and Ives, Kurz and Allison lithographs not meant to be historical representations, and even, from time to time, included historical inaccuracies. Even so, 'prints depicting the Civil War battles by Kurz and Allison are among the most sought after collectibles of Civil War enthusiasts.' Their prints are also notable for featuring Black soldiers, a rarity for the era. After the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, the firm published views from famous battles and even continued doing so into the campaigns of the Philippine-American War and the Russo-Japanese War.