1794 Anville Map of England in ancient Roman times.

England-horsley-1794
$400.00
Britanniae Antiquae Tabula Geographica ex. Evi Romani Monumentis…
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1794 Anville Map of England in ancient Roman times.

England-horsley-1794


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Title


Britanniae Antiquae Tabula Geographica ex. Evi Romani Monumentis…
  1794 (dated)    22 x 20 in (55.88 x 50.8 cm)

Description


A large and dramatic 1794 map of England under Roman Rule. Covers all of England (Province of Britanniae) as well as adjacent parts of Scotland, Ireland (Hibernia), and France (Gallia). Features both ancient and contemporary place names, ie. Londinium and London, for each destination - an invaluable resource or scholars of antiquity. Details mountains, rivers, cities, roadways, and lakes with political divisions highlighted in outline color. Title area appears in a in the upper right quadrant. Includes two distance scales, bottom right, referencing distance measurement systems common in antiquity. Text in Latin and English. Drawn by John Horsley in 1762 and published in 1794 by Laurie and Whittle, London.

CartographerS


John Horsley (1685 - 1732) was a Scottish Presbyterian minister and antiquarian active in the early 18th century. Horsely is best known for his publication of a three-volume study on Roman Antiquities in Britain in 1732. He created several important maps of England on Roman Times. Horsely is also known for his invention of a device for measuring rainfall, for which he was awarded membership in the Royal Society.


Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville (1697-1782) was perhaps the most important and prolific cartographer of the 18th century. D'Anville's passion for cartography manifested during his school years when he amused himself by composing maps for Latin texts. There is a preserved manuscript dating to 1712, Graecia Vetus, which may be his earliest surviving map - he was only 15 when he drew it. He would retain an interest in the cartography of antiquity throughout his long career and published numerous atlases to focusing on the ancient world. At twenty-two D'Anville, sponsored by the Duke of Orleans, was appointed Geographer to the King of France. As both a cartographer and a geographer, he instituted a reform in the general practice of cartography. Unlike most period cartographers, D'Anville did not rely exclusively on earlier maps to inform his work, rather he based his maps on intense study and research. His maps were thus the most accurate and comprehensive of his period - truly the first modern maps. Thomas Basset and Philip Porter write: "It was because of D'Anville's resolve to depict only those features which could be proven to be true that his maps are often said to represent a scientific reformation in cartography." (The Journal of African History, Vol. 32, No. 3 (1991), pp. 367-413). In 1754, when D'Anville turned 57 and had reached the height of his career, he was elected to the Academie des Inscriptions. Later, at 76, following the death of Philippe Buache, D'Anville was appointed to both of the coveted positions Buache held: Premier Geographe du Roi, and Adjoint-Geographer of the Academie des Sciences. During his long career D'Anville published some 211 maps as well as 78 treatises on geography. D'Anville's vast reference library, consisting of over 9000 volumes, was acquired by the French government in 1779 and became the basis of the Depot Geographique - though D'Anville retained physical possession his death in 1782. Remarkably almost all of D'Anville's maps were produced by his own hand. His published maps, most of which were engraved by Guillaume de la Haye, are known to be near exact reproductions of D'Anville' manuscripts. The borders as well as the decorative cartouche work present on many of his maps were produced by his brother Hubert-Francois Bourguignon Gravelot. The work of D'Anville thus marked a transitional point in the history of cartography and opened the way to the maps of English cartographers Cary, Thomson and Pinkerton in the early 19th century.


Laurie and Whittle (fl. 1794 - 1858) were London, England, based map and atlas publishers active in the late 18th and early 19th century. Generally considered to be the successors to the Robert Sayer firm, Laurie and Whittle was founded by Robert Laurie (c. 1755 - 1836) and James Whittle (1757-1818). Robert Laurie was a skilled mezzotint engraver and is known to have worked with Robert Sayer on numerous projects. James Whittle was a well-known London socialite and print seller whose Fleet Street shop was a popular haunt for intellectual luminaries. The partnership began taking over the general management of Sayer's firm around 1787; however, they did not alter the Sayer imprint until after Sayer's death in 1794. Apparently Laurie did most of the work in managing the firm and hence his name appeared first in the "Laurie and Whittle" imprint. Together Laurie and Whittle published numerous maps and atlases, often bringing in other important cartographers of the day, including Kitchin, Faden, Jefferys and others to update and modify their existing Sayer plates. Robert Laurie retired in 1812, leaving the day to day management of the firm to his son, Richard Holmes Laurie (1777 - 1858). Under R. H. Laurie and James Whittle, the firm renamed itself "Whittle and Laurie". Whittle himself died in six years later in 1818, and thereafter the firm continued under the imprint of "R. H. Laurie". After R. H. Laurie's death the publishing house and its printing stock came under control of Alexander George Findlay, who had long been associated with Laurie and Whittle. Since, Laurie and Whittle has passed through numerous permeations, with part of the firm still extant as an English publisher of maritime or nautical charts, 'Imray, Laurie, Norie and Wilson Ltd.' The firm remains the oldest surviving chart publisher in Europe.

Source


D'Anville, J. B. B., Complete Body of Ancient Geography, Laurie and Whittle, London, 1795.    

Condition


Very good condition. Original centerfold. Platemark visible. Blank on verso.