1874 Tardieu Map of France in Departments

FranceParDepartements-tardieu-1874
$100.00
France Par Departments. - Main View
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1874 Tardieu Map of France in Departments

FranceParDepartements-tardieu-1874

$100.00

Title


France Par Departments.
  1874 (undated)     15 x 17.5 in (38.1 x 44.45 cm)     1 : 3400000

Description


This is a fine 1874 map of France divided into its constituent departments by Ambroise Tardieu. It covers from the Nord in the north to eastern Pyrenees in the south and from Finistere in the west to Upper and Lower Rhein in the east. An inset map near the lower right corner details Corsica.

The French Department system was established on March 4th, 1790 by the National Constituent Assembly to replace the provinces with what the Assembly deemed a more rational structure. They were designed to deliberately break up France's historical regions in an attempt to erase cultural differences and build a more homogeneous nation. Initially there were 83 departments but by 1800 that number increased to roughly 130. Many of the departments that were created in 1790 remain the administrative districts to this day. Nonetheless, the province system was so engrained that most cartographers felt obliged to include two maps of France in their atlases, one showing the current department system, and another defining the defunct provinces.

This map was prepared by Ambroise Tardieu and issued as plate 12 in his 1874 edition of Atlas Universel de Geographie Ancienne et Moderne.

CartographerS


Ambroise Tardieu (March 2, 1788 - January 17, 1841) was a prominent French cartographer and engraver operating in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. He was member of the large and prolific Tardieu family, which, for over 200 years, produced multiple skilled and active engravers. Tardieu's work is known for its beauty and accuracy as well as for its depth of detail. Tardieu's most important work is his version of John Arrowsmith's large format map of the United States, published in 1806. Ambroise Tardieu is eclipsed in fame by his son, artist and medical scholar, August Ambroise Tardieu. Ambroise Tardieu is also frequently confused with Jean Baptiste Pierre Tardieu, another unrelated French map and print engraver active in the early 19th century. Learn More...


Alexandre Aimé Vuillemin (1812 - 1880) was an engraver, publisher, and editor based in Paris, France in the middle of the 19th century. Despite a prolific publishing career, much of Vuillemin's life is shrouded in mystery. In 1852, he married Josephine Caroline Goret and they had at least one child, Ernestine Adèle Vuillemin, later in the same year. What is known is that his studied under the prominent French Auguste Henri Dufour (1798 - 1865). Vuillemin's most important work his detailed, highly decorative large format Atlas Illustre de Geographie Commerciale et Industrielle. Learn More...

Source


Furne, Jouvet et Cie Atlas Universel de Geographie Ancienne et Moderne (Paris), 1874.    

Condition


Very good. Minor wear along original centerfold. Original platemark visible. Minor spotting and some manuscript marking over the northeast borders of France.

References


Rumsey 4697.016 (1863 edition).