1755 Homann Heirs and Bellin Map of the Great Lakes

GreatLakes-bellinhomann-1755
$2,500.00
Partie Occidentale de la Nouvelle France ou du Canada.
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1755 Homann Heirs and Bellin Map of the Great Lakes

GreatLakes-bellinhomann-1755

Important French and Indian War issue of Bellin's influential Map of the Great Lakes. Probabally the most decorative of the series.
$2,500.00

Title


Partie Occidentale de la Nouvelle France ou du Canada.
  1755 (dated)    17.4 x 21.5 in (44.196 x 54.61 cm)     1 : 3800000

Description


The map covers roughly from Turkey to the top of the Sinai Peninsula and from the Nile Delta to Damascus. There is an inset of Jerusalem. Most text is in Hebrew but the title and copyright are also written in English. The verso contains illustrations of important Jewish figures and Jewish life as well as text in English. Drawn by J. Keller and engraved by E. C. Bridgman, lithographer, for the Hebrew Publishing Company of New York. The map appears to have been issued to celebrate the New Year. This map is quite rare with only one other known example housed at the National Library of Israel. Not identified in Wajntraub.

CartographerS


Jacques-Nicolas Bellin (1703 - March 21, 1772) was one of the most important cartographers of the 18th century. With a career spanning some 50 years, Bellin is best understood as geographe de cabinet and transitional mapmaker spanning the gap between 18th and early-19th century cartographic styles. His long career as Hydrographer and Ingénieur Hydrographe at the French Dépôt des cartes et plans de la Marine resulted in hundreds of high quality nautical charts of practically everywhere in the world. A true child of the Enlightenment Era, Bellin's work focuses on function and accuracy tending in the process to be less decorative than the earlier 17th and 18th century cartographic work. Unlike many of his contemporaries, Bellin was always careful to cite his references and his scholarly corpus consists of over 1400 articles on geography prepared for Diderot's Encyclopedie. Bellin, despite his extraordinary success, may not have enjoyed his work, which is described as "long, unpleasant, and hard." In addition to numerous maps and charts published during his lifetime, many of Bellin's maps were updated (or not) and published posthumously. He was succeeded as Ingénieur Hydrographe by his student, also a prolific and influential cartographer, Rigobert Bonne.


Johann Baptist Homann (March 20, 1664 - July 1, 1724) was the most prominent and prolific map publisher of the 18th century. Homann was born in Oberkammlach, a small town near Kammlach, Bavaria, Germany. As a young man Homann studied in a Jesuit school and nursed ambitions of becoming a Dominican priest before converting to Protestantism in 1687. Following his conversion, Homann moved to Nuremberg and found employment as a notary. Around 1693 Homan briefly relocated to Vienna, where he lived and studied printing and copper plate engraving until 1695. Afterwards he returned to Nuremberg where, in 1702, he founded the commercial publishing firm that would bear his name. In the next five years Homann produced hundreds of maps and developed a distinctive style characterized by heavy detailed engraving, elaborate allegorical cartouche work, and vivid hand color. The Homann firm, due to the lower cost of printing in Germany, was able to undercut the dominant French and Dutch publishing houses while matching the diversity and quality of their output. By 1715 Homann's rising star caught the attention of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the VI, who appointed him Imperial Cartographer. In the same year he was also appointed a member of the Royal Academy of Sciences in Berlin. Homann's prestigious title came with a number of important advantages including access to the most up to date cartographic information as well as the "Privilege". The Privilege was a type of early copyright offered to a few individuals by the Holy Roman Emperor. Though not as sophisticated as modern copyright legislation, the Privilege did offer a kind of limited protection for several years. Most all J. B. Homann maps printed between 1715 and 1730 bear the inscription "Cum Priviligio" or some variation. Following Homann's death in 1726, the management of the firm passed to his son Johann Christoph Homann (1703 - 1730). J. C. Homann, perhaps realizing that he would not long survive his father, stipulated in his will that the company would be inherited by his two head managers, Johann Georg Ebersberger and Johann Michael Franz, and that it would publish only under the name Homann Heirs. This designation, in various forms (Homannsche Heirs, Heritiers de Homann, Lat Homannianos Herod, Homannschen Erben, etc..) appears on maps from about 1731 onwards. The firm continued to publish maps in ever diminishing quantities until the death of its last owner, Christoph Franz Fembo in 1848.

Source


Atlas Homannianus Mathematic-Historice Delineatus, (Homann Heirs, Nuremburg), 1755.    

Condition


Very good. Minor wear and toning on original centerfold. Minor ink stain upper right corner. Blank on verso.

References


OCLC Karpinski, 5440372. Bibliography of the Early Printed Maps of Michigan, p.138. Kershaw, Early Printed Maps of Canada III, 950, plate 715. Phillips, A List of Maps of America, p.191. Sellers & Van Ee, Maps & Charts of North America & West Indies, 19. Heidenreich & Dahl, 'The French Mapping of North America', The Map Collector, issue 19 (June, 1982). Schwartz & Ehrenberg, The Mapping of America, p.165, pl.97.