1895 Barthholomew Cyclist's Map of 50 Miles Around London, England

London50Miles-bartholomew-1895
$200.00
The Cyclist's Map of Fifty Miles Round London showing in color all rideable roads and dangerous hills.
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1895 Barthholomew Cyclist's Map of 50 Miles Around London, England

London50Miles-bartholomew-1895


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Title


The Cyclist's Map of Fifty Miles Round London showing in color all rideable roads and dangerous hills.
  c. 1895 (undated)    23 x 30 in (58.42 x 76.2 cm)

Description


This is J. Bartholomew's c. 1895 cyclist's may of 50 miles around London. Covers the greater London area from Ricester in the northwest eastwards and southwards as far as the coast. Includes the counties of Buckingham, Hertford, Essex, Middlesex, Surrey, Kent, and Sussex. By the end of the 19th century bicycling in London (and vicinity) had evolved beyond recreation to become a practical way to get from place to place. Cyclist's maps, like this one, began appearing around 1870 and continued to be published well into modern times. Map shows town, rivers, forests, parks, roads and all practical bicycling routes. Mileage from London is noted in ten mile increments. Curiously for a cycling map, this map also shows various offshore shoals, sandbars, and shipping routes. Attached to an extremely attractive decorative binder.

Cartographer


The cartographic story of the Bartholomew family begins with George Bartholomew (January, 8 1784 - October 23, 1871, active from 1797), an engraver in the employ of the Daniel Lizars firm of Edinburgh. George was the first of six generations in the Bartholomew map-making dynasty. It was his son, John Bartholomew Sr. (1805 - April 9, 1861) who ultimately founded John Bartholomew and Sons in 1828. The John Bartholomew firm produced thousands of maps and rose to become one of the largest and most prolific cartography firms in Scotland. John Sr. was succeeded by his son, also John Bartholomew Jr. (1831-93). John George Bartholomew (1860-1920), son of John Bartholomew (1831-93) took control of the firm at its height. John George was a charter member of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society and supported the creation of a National Institute of Geography - a good idea that never took off. John George is also reliably attributed to be the first to bring the term "Antarctica" into popular usage as a denominator for the Southern Continent. In recognition of his work, John George was awarded a warrant from the king and often used the title "Cartographer to the King" on his imprint. Among his friends and admirers he was referred to as the "Prince of Cartography". Today the John Bartholomew firm has been absorbed into the HarperCollins family of publishers. The vast archive of maps and atlases produced by the Bartholomew family has since been transferred to the National Library of Scotland where it is currently in the cataloguing process.

Condition


Very good condition. Wear and verso reinforcement along original fold lines. Folds into original decorative cardboard binder.

References


Hyde, Ralph, Printed Maps of Victorian London, 1851 - 1900, 274.