1926 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Map of Field Work in Hawaii

ProgressHawaii-uscgs-1926
$125.00
U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Progress of Field Work Hawaiian Islands Fiscal Year 1926.
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1926 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Map of Field Work in Hawaii

ProgressHawaii-uscgs-1926

Includes an inset map of the Panama Canal!
$125.00

Title


U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Progress of Field Work Hawaiian Islands Fiscal Year 1926.
  1926 (dated)    15 x 22 in (38.1 x 55.88 cm)     1 : 1200000

Description


This is a 1926 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey map of the Hawaiian Islands. The map depicts and labels the main Hawaiian Islands of Hawaii, Maui, Lanai, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai, and Nihau. Several channels between the islands are also labeled.

Created for the Annual Report of the Director, United States Coast and Geodetic Survey of 1926, field work accomplished by the agency that year is illustrated, using different forms of notation. Hydrographic work, completed along the southern coast of Oahu, near Molokai, and off Kauai and Nihau, is presented by shading the area in a light shade of blue. Topographic work was finished on Oahu, Kauai, Molokai, and Maui, as noted by the green shading. Triangulation surveys, denoted by the red lines, were completed along the southern coast of Oahu.

A key is situated in the upper right hand corner and explains the differences in shading and notations. A table, just below the key, lists the stations and observatories founded during Fiscal Year 1926. A magnetic observatory, a seismological station, and eight primary tide stations were founded. In the lower left corner, a large inset map of the Panama Canal is present. This map illustrates that no hydrography, topography, or triangulation work was accomplished in the area the previous year, but does state that two primary tide stations were founded.

This map was produced by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey for inclusion in the Annual Report of the Director of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. The director in 1926 was E. Lester Jones.

Cartographer


The Office of the Coast Survey (later the U.S. Geodetic Survey) (1807 - present), founded in 1807 by President Thomas Jefferson and Secretary of Commerce Albert Gallatin, is the oldest scientific organization in the U.S. Federal Government. Jefferson created the "Survey of the Coast," as it was then called, in response to a need for accurate navigational charts of the new nation's coasts and harbors. The first superintendent of the Coast Survey was Swiss immigrant and West Point mathematics professor Ferdinand Hassler. Under the direction of Hassler, from 1816 to 1843, the ideological and scientific foundations for the Coast Survey were established. Hassler, and the Coast Survey under him developed a reputation for uncompromising dedication to the principles of accuracy and excellence. Hassler lead the Coast Survey until his death in 1843, at which time Alexander Dallas Bache, a great-grandson of Benjamin Franklin, took the helm. Under the leadership A. D. Bache, the Coast Survey did most of its most important work. During his Superintendence, from 1843 to 1865, Bache was steadfast advocate of American science and navigation and in fact founded the American Academy of Sciences. Bache was succeeded by Benjamin Pierce who ran the Survey from 1867 to 1874. Pierce was in turn succeeded by Carlile Pollock Patterson who was Superintendent from 1874 to 1881. In 1878, under Patterson's superintendence, the U.S. Coast Survey was reorganized as the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (C & GS or USGS) to accommodate topographic as well as nautical surveys. Today the Coast Survey is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or NOAA.

Source


Jones, E. Lester, Annual Report of the Director, United States Coast and Geodetic Survey to the Secretary of Commerce for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1926 (Washington: Government Printing Office) 1926.    

Condition


Very good. Slight wear along original fold lines. Blank on verso.