1913 Ginty Map of San Francisco

SanFrancisco-ginty-1913
$750.00
Map of the City and County of San Francisco Revised and Correted from the Field Maps of the Assessors Office under Supervision of John Ginty, Assessor.
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1913 Ginty Map of San Francisco

SanFrancisco-ginty-1913

A most unusual map of San Franciso drawn by City Assessor, John Ginty.

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Title


Map of the City and County of San Francisco Revised and Correted from the Field Maps of the Assessors Office under Supervision of John Ginty, Assessor.
  1913 (dated)    24.5 x 29.5 in (62.23 x 74.93 cm)     1 : 17000

Description


A scarce map of the city of San Francisco issued in 1913 by John Ginty. The map covers from the Gold Gate South roughly as far as the southern tip of Lake Merced. City blocks are identified numerically. Important buildings, parks, and city wards are also noted. This map was described by a contemporary in 1914 as thus
Mr. Ginty also is the inventor of an ingenious map and street guide by which a stranger in the city could, inside of one minute, locate on the map any block of land, public, building or given address, and the street car line that would carry him there. Travelers familiar with the Baedeker guide used in most European cities and with the street guides of the principal cities of the United States, declare that Mr. Ginty's map and street guide is superior to any guidebook they have had occasion to use.
We are aware of three editions, of which is the first. A second edition was issued in 1914, and a third, in wall map format, in 1923.

Cartographer


John Ginty (fl. c. 1910 – c. 1925) was a San Francisco based banker, civil servant, and railroad man. Ginty initially wanted to become a journalist and left his home at just 14 in pursuit of that career. He took work at a printing office but found, to his consternation, that the work was not for him. Instead he mastered the telegraph and took work in the railroad industry as a station agent, then superintendent clerk, and finally train dispatcher. He followed the railroad to San Francisco, settling there in 1868, and transitioning into banking. He worked in the San Francisco Office of the Assessor under Washington Dodge before assuming the position of Chief Assessor, formerly held by Dodge, in August of 1912. Ginty was known among his peers as 'quiet and unassuming.' Little else is known of his life.

Condition


Good. Some discoloration near Presidio Reservation. Backed on archival tissue.

References


OCLC 907629661.