1873 A. and C. Black Map or Chart of the Solar System

SolarSystem-black-1873
$130.00
The Solar System. / Theory of the Seasons.
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1873 A. and C. Black Map or Chart of the Solar System

SolarSystem-black-1873


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Title


The Solar System. / Theory of the Seasons.
  1873 (undated)    10.5 x 16.5 in (26.67 x 41.91 cm)

Description


This is Adam and Charles Black's 1873 chart of the Solar System and the Theory of the Seasons. The Black brothers introduced this map in the 1850s and it went through a series of revisions and editions well into the 1880s. This example, from 1873, is one of the first editions of this map to make use of chromolithographic printing techniques - previous editions were black and white. The left hand side of the chart shows the Solar System with extensive explanatory text. The right hand side of the map offers a number of charts showing how the rotation of the earth around the sun affects the seasons. Also offers charts on the tides, eclipses, the phases of the moon, summer and winder, the atmosphere, and a mariners Compass. Engraved by J. Bartholomew and printed by W. H. M Earlane, both of Edinburgh, for the publishing firm of Adam and Charles Black. Issued as plate no. 7 in the 1873 edition of Black's General Atlas of the World.

CartographerS


Charles and Adam Black (fl. 1807 - present) were map and book publishers based in Edinburgh. Charles and his uncle, Adam, both of Edinburgh, Scotland, founded their publishing firm in 1807. They published a series of maps and atlases throughout the 19th century. In addition to an array of atlases, the Black firm is known for their editions of the Encyclopedia Britannica (1817 - 1826) and the first publishing of Sir Walter Scott's novels in 1854. In 1889 the A. & C. Black publishing house moved to London where it remains in operation to this day.


The Bartholomew Family (fl. c. 1810 - 1920) is clan of map publishers active in London through the 19th century. They represent one of the great names in British cartography. The cartographic story of the Bartholomew family begins with George Bartholomew (January, 8 1784 - October 23, 1871, active from 1797), an engraver in the employ of the Daniel Lizars firm of Edinburgh. George was the first of six generations in the Bartholomew map-making dynasty. It was his son, John Bartholomew Sr. (1805 - April 9, 1861) who ultimately founded John Bartholomew and Sons in 1828. The John Bartholomew firm produced thousands of maps and rose to become one of the largest and most prolific cartography firms in Scotland. John Sr. was succeeded by his son, also John Bartholomew Jr. (1831-93). John George Bartholomew (1860-1920), son of John Bartholomew (1831-93) took control of the firm at its height. John George was a charter member of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society and supported the creation of a National Institute of Geography - a good idea that never took off. John George is also reliably attributed to be the first to bring the term "Antarctica" into popular usage as a denominator for the Southern Continent. In recognition of his work, John George was awarded a warrant from the king and often used the title "Cartographer to the King" on his imprint. Among his friends and admirers he was referred to as the "Prince of Cartography". Today the John Bartholomew firm has been absorbed into the HarperCollins family of publishers. The vast archive of maps and atlases produced by the Bartholomew family has since been transferred to the National Library of Scotland where it is currently in the cataloguing process.

Source


Black A. and C., General Atlas Of The World, 1873.    

Condition


Good. A couple of minor creases and margin reaparis. Else clean.