1945 Chapin Map of Central Europe for TIME Magazine

TheFloodsCome-chapin-1945
$850.00
The Floods Come.
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1945 Chapin Map of Central Europe for TIME Magazine

TheFloodsCome-chapin-1945

Depicts the Allied advance into Germany as a red flood over gray land.
$850.00

Title


The Floods Come.
  1945 (dated)    42 x 29 in (106.68 x 73.66 cm)     1 : 1200000

Description


This is an enlarged, separate issue version of a 1945 R. M. Chapin, Jr. map of Central Europe created for TIME Magazine. The map depicts the region from just west of the Rhine River to eastern Poland and the Oder River and from the Baltic Sea to Italy and the Balkans. The Allied advance, from both east and west, is illustrated as a flood bursting through dams and coloring all of gray Germany blood red. The Americans, British, Canadian, and French armies were 'flooding' across the Rhine in four different places, including Remagen, where American forces had famously captured the last bridge traversing the river. From the east, the Soviet army was breaking through from the White Russian (Belarussian) front, as well as in the Balkans. The drive into Germany was on. In the south, U.S. and British forces are noted as having reached just outside of Bologne, Italy. As the armies raced toward Berlin, Chapin presents the viewer with a question: Does Hitler have an inner fortress around Berchtesgaden, his fabled hideaway in the Alps? Chapin sketches a circle around Berchtesgaden, stretching from Trieste to Pilsen, perhaps proposing that, even though the Allied armies had broken through into Germany, the possibility of hard fighting still lingered.

Numerous cities throughout central Europe are labeled, including Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Milan, Verona, Venice, Zagreb, Bratislava, Zurich, Stuttgart, Leipzig, Bremen, and Hamburg. Berlin, notably, is marked by a tattered white Nazi flag, instead of the blood red standard that had been flying since 1933. The Rhine, Elbe, Weser, and Oder Rivers are illustrated and labeled, along with the Alps and Apennines.

This map is an enlargement of a map that was created by R. M. Chapin Jr., a TIME Magazine cartographer, for the April 9, 1945 issue of TIME Magazine.

Cartographer


Robert M. Chapin Jr. (fl. 1933 - 1970) was a prominent architect, cartographer and illustrator active during World War II and the Cold War. Chapin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1933 with a degree in architecture. Since this was the height of the Great Depression, and architects in low demand, he instead took work as a staff cartographer at Newsweek. Catching the attention of Manfred Gottfried of Time, Chapin was offered an accepted a position at the head of Time's cartography department. He remained with Time for some 33 years, from 1937 to 1970, often drawn 2 - 3 new thematic maps weekly. With an architect's gift visualizing information, Chapin became a skilled informational cartographer, heading the cartography department at Time Magazine. Chapin, like Fortune Magazine chief cartographer, Richard Edes Harrison, Chapin was at the forefront of infographic propaganda cartography, a genre that matured during the World War II Era and remains popular today. Working for Time Magazine, Chapin developed a signature style for his long run of 'War Maps.' Chapin was known for his maverick airbrush technique which lead to strong color splashes and intense shading. He also incorporated celluloid stencils to illustrate bomb explosions, flags, sinking ships, and more - generating a instantly recognizable standardized style. Chapin's Time war maps were further distinctive for their use of strong bold reds as a universal symbol of hostility. Chapin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1933 with a degree in architecture. Since this was the height of the Great Depression, an d architects in low demand, he instead took work as a staff cartographer at Newsweek. Catching the attention of Manfred Gottfried of Time, Chapin was offered an accepted a position at the head of Time's cartography department. He remained with Time for some 33 years, from 1937 to 1970, often drawn 2 - 3 new thematic maps weekly. Chapin live in Sharon Connecticut.

Condition


Very good. Wear along original fold lines. Blank on verso.

References


Rumsey 12397.000.