1862 Valentine View of Trinity Church (Financial District), New York City

TrinityPlace-valentine-1862
$120.00
Trinity Place Behind Trinity Church - 1861.
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1862 Valentine View of Trinity Church (Financial District), New York City

TrinityPlace-valentine-1862

Beautiful View of Trinity Place and Trinity Church in New York City,
$120.00

Title


Trinity Place Behind Trinity Church - 1861.
  1862 (dated)    4.5 x 7 in (11.43 x 17.78 cm)

Description


This is a beautiful view of Trinity Place in New York City issued by D. T. Valentine. The view looks southward on Trinity Place with Trinity Church and the Trinity Church cemetery on the left. It features a gravedigger near a grave, some trees and bushes in the foreground and surrounding buildings. Illustrates the third and current Trinity Church buildings, built in 1846, which, with its spire and cross was the highest point in New York until 1890. This view was engraved by Sarony, Major and Knapp and published as part of D. T. Valentine’s Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York, 1862.

CartographerS


David T. (Thomas) Valentine (1801 - 1869) served as the Clerk of the Common Council of New York City. He edited and published a series of New York City almanacs and fact books entitled Manual of the Corporation Of The City of New York. Valentine's Manual, as it came to be called, included facts about the City of New York, city council information, city history, and reported on the progress of public works such as Central Park. The production of this annual manual was the responsibility of the Clerk of the City of New York, a position held at different times by D. Valentine and by Joseph Shannon, who also produced a similar manual. Valentine used his manual to reproduce some of the rarest and most important maps of New York City ever created.


Napoleon Sarony (March 9, 1821 - November 9, 1896) was a dashingly handsome Canadian-American lithographer and publisher active in New York in the mid to late 19th century. Sarony was born in Quebec and emigrated to New York City in 1835. He apprenticed under Henry Robinson (fl. 1830/33 - 1850) before working as a lithograph artist for Nathaniel Currier (1813 - 1888). In 1846, he partnered with Currier's apprentice lithographer Henry B. Major to establish the firm of 'Sarony and Major.' From offices at 117 Futon Street, they published under this imprint until roughly 1853, when Sarony split off on his own under the imprint 'Sarony and Co.', still at 117 Fulton. At the time 'and Co.' probably to Joseph Fairchild Knapp (1832 - 1891), Sarony's apprentice and Richard C. Major, possibly Henry Major's son. In 1857, a new imprint was established as 'Sarony, Major and Knapp'. According to an advertisement in the New York Times (Feb 16, 1864), Sarony had invested in the business at founding, but was not an active partner, possibly because he was traveling in Europe. It is unclear why Sarony's name was maintained, possibly to capitalize on his fame, as a honorific, or possibly because he owned a major stake. They published under this imprint until 1863, becoming a major concern at 449 Broadway. Sarony's name was formally removed from the partnership in 1863. At the time he was traveling in Europe, mastering the most advanced color lithography and photographic techniques. He is known to have worked in France, Germany, and England. He returned to New York in the 1860s, establishing a photography company at 37 Union Square that became famous for its portraits of late-19th-century American theater icons. In 1891, Sarony, hoping to capitalize on Sarah Bernhardt's fame as 'Cleopatra', paid the stage actress 1,500 USD to sit for a photo session, the modern-day equivalent of 20,000 USD - suggesting a highly prosperous business. His son, Otto Sarony (1850–1903), continued the family business as a theater and film star photographer. As an aside, Sarony's second wife, Louie Sarony, was a known eccentric who would reportedly dress in elaborate rented costumes to walk around Washington Square each afternoon.

Source


Valentine, D. T., Valentine's Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York, (New York) 1861.    

Condition


Very good. Minor toning along edges.
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