1943 Chapin Map of the Balkans and Eastern Europe for TIME Magazine

TurkeyCrossroads-chapin-1943
$850.00
Turkey at the Crossroads.
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1943 Chapin Map of the Balkans and Eastern Europe for TIME Magazine

TurkeyCrossroads-chapin-1943

A map of the Allied invasion of the Balkans - that never happened.
$850.00

Title


Turkey at the Crossroads.
  1943 (dated)    40 x 32.5 in (101.6 x 82.55 cm)

Description


This is an enlarged, separate issue version of a 1943 R. M. Chapin, Jr. map of the Balkans and eastern Europe created for TIME Magazine. The map depicts the region from Germany and Poland to Turkey and from Berlin and Belgrade to the Soviet Union and the Black Sea. Illustrating a proposed Allied advance across the Bosphorus and into Greece and Bulgaria, this little-known front of World War II saw some harrowing action. The map notes that Sofia, Bulgaria was bombed 'last week' and Ploeisti, Romania in August was the costliest Allied bombing raid of the war. In that raid 53 aircraft and 660 airmen were lost. Although an Allied invasion of this style never occurred, the simple threat tied down Axis (German) troops and stoked resistance efforts in the region. It also helped stall, and then reverse, the stretch of the 'shadow' of Nazi Germany.

This map is an enlargement of a map that was created by R. M. Chapin Jr., a TIME Magazine cartographer, for the December 20, 1943 issue of TIME Magazine.

Cartographer


Robert M. Chapin Jr. (fl. 1933 - 1970) was a prominent architect, cartographer and illustrator active during World War II and the Cold War. Chapin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1933 with a degree in architecture. Since this was the height of the Great Depression, and architects in low demand, he instead took work as a staff cartographer at Newsweek. Catching the attention of Manfred Gottfried of Time, Chapin was offered an accepted a position at the head of Time's cartography department. He remained with Time for some 33 years, from 1937 to 1970, often drawn 2 - 3 new thematic maps weekly. With an architect's gift visualizing information, Chapin became a skilled informational cartographer, heading the cartography department at Time Magazine. Chapin, like Fortune Magazine chief cartographer, Richard Edes Harrison, Chapin was at the forefront of infographic propaganda cartography, a genre that matured during the World War II Era and remains popular today. Working for Time Magazine, Chapin developed a signature style for his long run of 'War Maps.' Chapin was known for his maverick airbrush technique which lead to strong color splashes and intense shading. He also incorporated celluloid stencils to illustrate bomb explosions, flags, sinking ships, and more - generating a instantly recognizable standardized style. Chapin's Time war maps were further distinctive for their use of strong bold reds as a universal symbol of hostility. Chapin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1933 with a degree in architecture. Since this was the height of the Great Depression, an d architects in low demand, he instead took work as a staff cartographer at Newsweek. Catching the attention of Manfred Gottfried of Time, Chapin was offered an accepted a position at the head of Time's cartography department. He remained with Time for some 33 years, from 1937 to 1970, often drawn 2 - 3 new thematic maps weekly. Chapin live in Sharon Connecticut.

Condition


Good. Backed on archival tissue for stability. Even overall toning. Exhibits some loss along original fold lines. Blank on verso.

References


Rumsey 8775.000.