1867 General Land Office Map of the United States w/ Gold Deposits

UnitedStates-landoffice-1867
$1,350.00
Map of the United States and Territories, Showing the extend of Public Surveys and other details.
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1867 General Land Office Map of the United States w/ Gold Deposits

UnitedStates-landoffice-1867

Early Land Office map showing important gold and silver deposits.

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Title


Map of the United States and Territories, Showing the extend of Public Surveys and other details.
  1867 (dated)    29 x 56 in (73.66 x 142.24 cm)     1 : 3800000

Description


This is an extremely interesting 1867 U.S. Land Office map of United States. It covers the entire country on a rectangular projection, illustrating the extant of the land surveys as it worked its way westward. This map notes the progress of the Transcontinental Railroad, which was at the time still under construction. This map was issued just three years after the Montana Territory was created and a year prior to the creation of the Wyoming Territory. The General Land Office, during this period of westward expansion, also issued similar maps in various languages and distributed them throughout the world, in order to promote investment and immigration.

This large format map pays particular attention to the western states, with updated surveys and information regarding railroads, land districts, mineral deposits, location of U.S. Surveyor and Land Offices, land grants, etc., giving an up-to-date picture of the progress and development on the lands west of the Mississippi.

In this map the surveyed areas are subdivide by tiny squares. It also illustrates mineral deposits throughout the country with the rich gold and silver deposits in California, Colorado, Arizona, Nevada, and Montana clearly noted. The map also notes some topographical features, American Indian territories, the locations of fortifications, major and minor cities, transcontinental and local railway lines, and the routes taken by notable military expeditions and explorers.

This map was prepared to accompany the Report of the Commissioner of General Land Office for the Year 1868.

CartographerS


The General Land Office, created in 1812, was an independent agency charged with the administration and sale of public lands of the western territories of the United States under the Preemption Act of 1841 and the Homestead Act of 1862. During a time of frenetic energy and rapid westward expansion, the Land Office oversaw the surveying, platting, mapping and eventually the sale of much of the Western United States and Florida. The structural layout of the western United States that we see today, and many of their district and county divisions, are direct result of the early surveying work of the General Land Office. More importantly, as a branch of the Federal Government in Washington D.C. and the only agency able to legally sell and administer public lands in the western territories of the United States, the General Land Office played a pivotal role in consolidating power away from the original states and into the hand of the centralized federal government. The General Land Office was absorbed into the Department of Interior in 1849 and in 1946 merged with the United States Grazing Service to become the Bureau of Land Management. Today the Bureau of Land Management administers the roughly 246 million acres of public land remaining under federal ownership.


Joseph R. Bien was a topographer and an engineer working the later part of the 19th century. His name appears a number of state and regional atlases, including the important 1895 Atlas of New York. Most of Joseph Bien's work was published in conjunction with the New York Lithographing, Engraving & Printing Company, which was founded by Julius Bien. Joseph was almost certainly related to Julien, though whether he was a son, cousin, or brother, remains unknown.

Source


Wilson, J., Report of the Commissioner of General Land office for the Year 1868, (Washington, Government Printing Office) 1868.    

Condition


Very good. Minor wear along original fold lines. Minor spotting at places. Professionally flattened and backed with archival paper.

References


OCLC: 9683641. Rumsey 1882.001. Wheat, C. I., Mapping of the Transmississippi West, 1540 – 1861, # 1168. Library of Congress, G3701.B5 1867 .U51. Boston Public Library, Leventhal Collection, G3701.B5 1867 .U55.