1862 Harpers Weekly View of Washington D.C. and vicinity

Washington-harpersweekly-1862
$350.00
General Birds-Eye View of Washington and the Vicinity, Showing the Forts, Camps, Railroads, Rivers, etc.
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1862 Harpers Weekly View of Washington D.C. and vicinity

Washington-harpersweekly-1862


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Title


General Birds-Eye View of Washington and the Vicinity, Showing the Forts, Camps, Railroads, Rivers, etc.
  1862 (dated)    16 x 21 in (40.64 x 53.34 cm)

Description


This is a stunning 1862 birds-eye view map or view of Washington D. C. and vicinity issued in the January 4, 1862 edition of Harper's Weekly. This view offers a fascinating snapshot of the nation's capitol shortly after the outbreak of the American Civil War. The view captures Washington looking southward from around Mayfair towards Warrenton and beyond.

The map shows the capital and its vicinity in considerable detail. Streets, railroads, parks, rivers, forts, camps, bridges and important buildings are noted throughout with a legend along the bottom of the view. Some of these include Bluff Point, Mount Vernon, Fort Washington, Alexandria, Hunting Creek, Aqueduct Bridge, Little Falls, Prospect Hill, Navy Yard, Washington Monument, City Hall, Capitol, President's House (former name for the White House) etc.

This view was issued as part of the January 4, 1862 edition of Harper's Weekly, with part of Charles Dickens' new Christmas Stories appearing on verso.

Cartographer


Harper's Weekly (1825 - 1916), subtitled "A Journal of Civilization" was a weekly political magazine and news journal published out of New York City. The Harper brothers, James, John, Joseph and Fletcher, began publishing in 1825. Inspired by the London Illustrated News, they created Harper's Weekly in 1857. The important weekly journal witnessed some of the most important moments in history from the American Civil War, to the serialized publishing of Dickens novels, to the inventions of the modern Santa Clause by illustrator Thomas Nast. Harpers continued to publish until 1916. The Harper name is still alive in the magazine business to this day.

Source


Harper's Weekly, Jan 4, 1862, p. 8-9.    

Condition


Very good. Minor wear and toning along original centerfold. Minor spotting and edge wear. Text on verso.

References


Princeton University Library, Graphic Arts Collection, GA 2008.01672.