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1784 Bowles Map of the North Atlantic Islands: Iceland, Faroe Islands and Maelstrom

IcelandWhirlpool-bowles-1784
$350.00
The Islands of Fero or Farro by Jacobson Debes.  The Form of the Whirlpool At the South East of Sumbo with the Soundings.  Iceland by Herman Moll Geographer. - Main View
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1784 Bowles Map of the North Atlantic Islands: Iceland, Faroe Islands and Maelstrom

IcelandWhirlpool-bowles-1784


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Title


The Islands of Fero or Farro by Jacobson Debes. The Form of the Whirlpool At the South East of Sumbo with the Soundings. Iceland by Herman Moll Geographer.
  1784 (undated)     7.5 x 10.5 in (19.05 x 26.67 cm)     1 : 220000

Description


This is a singularly fascinating 1784 map of Iceland and the Faroe Islands issued by Carrington Bowles. Essentially a compilation of three maps on a single sheet, this map of the North Atlantic islands is festooned with speculations and curiosities.

The map on the left depicts the Faroe Islands. Today these stunning green islands are considered one of the most beautiful and unspoiled places on Earth. Our map depicts the Faroe Islands according a map contained in a 17th century book on the islands written by Jacobson Debes.

The Faroe Islands have been historically treacherous for mariners due to the unpredictable currents and tides surrounding them. One of the most curious and legendary results of these currents is the great maelstrom that once roared at the southern tip of Sunderoe (today Suouroy Island) - depicted on our map at the top right. This mighty whirlpool swirled around a sheer pinnacle of rock called Monek, which was said to resemble a monk from one side and a sailing ship from the other. Reports say that the whirlpool was over a mile in diameter. Soundings show that the waters surrounding the whirlpool had a depth of some 80 to 90 fathoms, but that the waters nearer the rock, at the center of the maelstrom, were but 7 to 10 fathoms deep. Sadly this startling natural phenomenon is no more. In 1884 much of Monek Rock crumbled into the sea, creating a dangerous underwater reef and displacing the unique convergence that created the maelstrom.

In the lower right hand quadrant of our chart is a map of Iceland drawn by Herman Moll. Iceland had been fairly well mapped since the late 16th century. This map, updated from earlier maps, shows the royal residence and four primary provinces.

This map was issued by Carrington Bowles in London in 1784.

CartographerS


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