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1780 Mannevillette Map or Nautical Chart of Taiwan (Formosa) and Fujian, China

Taiwan-mannevillette-1780
$3,500.00
Carte de la coste orientale de la Chine depuis Amoy, jusqu'a Chusan avec une partie de l'Isle Formose. [untitled] - Main View
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1780 Mannevillette Map or Nautical Chart of Taiwan (Formosa) and Fujian, China

Taiwan-mannevillette-1780

18th century nautical chart of the coast of Taiwan or Formosa.

SOLD

Title


Carte de la coste orientale de la Chine depuis Amoy, jusqu'a Chusan avec une partie de l'Isle Formose. [untitled]
  1780 (undated)     23 x 19 in (58.42 x 48.26 cm)

Description


A scarce c.1780 British edition of D'Apres de Mannevillette's nautical chart or map of Taiwan (Formosa) and the mainland Fujian Coast, China. The map offers rich detail including countless depth soundings, notes on the seafloor, commentary on reefs, rhumb lines, shoals, place names and a wealth of other practical information for the mariner.

The basic cartography of this map dates to Mannevillette's voyages as pilot for the Compagnie des Indies in the early 1700s : Carte de la coste orientale de la Chine depuis Amoy, jusqu'a Chusan avec une partie de l'Isle Formose. His work was originally published in Paris in the 1745 Neptune Oriental and republished in 1775 in an expanded second edition. The present example has been updated and re-engraved for an English client base. New additions include the incorporation of 'Longitude from London' and the removal of the French title. There is an inset map of Amoy in the upper left quadrant. This may well be the from the 1775 edition, but is most likely published by Laurie and Whittle in their East-India Pilot.

CartographerS


Jean-Baptiste Nicolas Denis d'Après de Mannevillette (February 11, 1707 - March 1, 1780) was a French sailor, navigator, and hydrographer active in the mid-18th century. Mannevillette was born in Le Havre to a family of wealthy seafarers. He completed his first major voyage at 12, when he accompanied his father, Jean-Baptiste-Claude d'Après de Blangy, a captain of the Compagnie des Indes (French East India Company) vessel Solide to Bengal. On his return to France, he he studied mathematics and navigation in Paris under Joseph Nicholas De L'Isle (1688 - 1768) before returning to the sea at 19 as a fourth officer as on the merchant vessel Marechel d'Estrees. Mannevillette himself eventually attained the rank of Captain with the Compagnie des Indes. In the course of numerous voyages around Africa to India and China, Mannevillette collected and revised numerous nautical charts. His sophisticated use of the most modern instruments, most specifically the Octant or English Quarter, and keen mathematical mind, enabled Mannevillette to correct many significant errors common to earlier maps. These updates were eventually compiled and published in Mannevillette's most significant work, the 1745 Le Neptune Oriental. The 1745 Neptune Oriental was commissioned by the Compagnie des Indes and its production earned Mannevillette admission into the Academy of Sciences. The atlas was well received, but shortly after publication, most unsold examples were destroyed by the French Admiralty, who considered the secrets of East Indian navigation too dangerous for dissemination. In 1762 the Compagnie des Indes appointed Mannevillette director of chart at Lorient. In 1767 King Louis XV conferred the Order of St. Michael upon him and made him an associate of the Royal Marine Academy. In the 30 years following his first publication of Le Neptune Oriental, Mannevillette worked doggedly with his lifelong friend, Alexander Dalrymple (1737 - 1808) to update his original work with new and improved charts. In 1775, he republished his opus in a greatly expanded format - by this time nautical information was less tightly guarded. Mannevillette died on March 1, 1780 at 75 years of age. Learn More...


Laurie and Whittle (fl. 1794 - 1858) were London, England, based map and atlas publishers active in the late 18th and early 19th century. Generally considered to be the successors to the Robert Sayer firm, Laurie and Whittle was founded by Robert Laurie (c. 1755 - 1836) and James Whittle (1757-1818). Robert Laurie was a skilled mezzotint engraver and is known to have worked with Robert Sayer on numerous projects. James Whittle was a well-known London socialite and print seller whose Fleet Street shop was a popular haunt for intellectual luminaries. The partnership began taking over the general management of Sayer's firm around 1787; however, they did not alter the Sayer imprint until after Sayer's death in 1794. Apparently Laurie did most of the work in managing the firm and hence his name appeared first in the "Laurie and Whittle" imprint. Together Laurie and Whittle published numerous maps and atlases, often bringing in other important cartographers of the day, including Kitchin, Faden, Jefferys and others to update and modify their existing Sayer plates. Robert Laurie retired in 1812, leaving the day to day management of the firm to his son, Richard Holmes Laurie (1777 - 1858). Under R. H. Laurie and James Whittle, the firm renamed itself "Whittle and Laurie". Whittle himself died six years later in 1818, and thereafter the firm continued under the imprint of "R. H. Laurie". After R. H. Laurie's death the publishing house and its printing stock came under control of Alexander George Findlay, who had long been associated with Laurie and Whittle. Since, Laurie and Whittle has passed through numerous permeations, with part of the firm still extant as an English publisher of maritime or nautical charts, 'Imray, Laurie, Norie and Wilson Ltd.' The firm remains the oldest surviving chart publisher in Europe. Learn More...

Source


Mannevillette, Jean-Baptiste d'Apres de, Le Neptune Oriental, (Paris) 1775.    

Condition


Very good. Original platemark visible. Minor spotting.

References


OCLC 495095339.