1900 Chicago Tribune Pictorial Boxer Rebellion Map of China

BoxerRebellionChina-chicagotribune-1900
$450.00
Map of the Seat of War in China.  Supplement to the Chicago Tribune, Sunday, Septemer 16th 1900.
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1900 Chicago Tribune Pictorial Boxer Rebellion Map of China

BoxerRebellionChina-chicagotribune-1900

Stunning pictorial map of China during the Boxer Rebellion.

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Title


Map of the Seat of War in China. Supplement to the Chicago Tribune, Sunday, Septemer 16th 1900.
  1900 (dated)    20 x 14 in (50.8 x 35.56 cm)     1: 1500000

Description


This is a rare chromolithograph pictorial map of China issued by the Chicago Tribune on Sunday, September 16, 1900, to illustrate the events of the Boxer Rebellion or Yihetuan Movement. The map details China from Hainan to the Mongolia and from Sichuan to the China Sea. An inset details the route from Peking to the Gulf of Pechili (Bohai Sea), where most of the action of the Boxer Rebellion took place. The surround is of particular reference and features illustrations of armed Boxers and chinoiserie lettering on Chinese style hanging lanterns.

The Boxer Rebellion or Yihetuan Movement was an anti-foreign anti-imperialist uprising marked by proto-nationalism in northeastern China. The rebellion was largely a response to Christian missionary activity in China and was initially supported by the Qing Empress Dowager Cixi. In June of 1900 the quasi-spiritual Boxers, convinced they were immune to foreign weapons, attacked the Chinese Christians and foreign nationals living in Beijing's Legation Quarter. Although many killings ensued the Legation Quarter was able to mount a tenuous defense, as outlined here. Relief came quickly in the form of the Eight-Nation Alliance, which, with an army of some 20,000, defeated the Boxers and occupied Beijing, as well as a number of other northern Chinese cities. The atrocities and looting that ensued, particularly at the hands of Russian and Japanese forces, are well documented and horrifying.

This map was issued as a supplement to the September 16, 1900 edition of the Chicago Tribune. It was prepared and printed by the American Lithographic Company of New York.

Cartographer


The American Lithographic Company (1892 – 1929) was an American printing concern based in New York City. The firm was formed when Joseph Palmer Knapp (1864-1951), son of Joseph Fairchild Knapp (1832-1891) of the publishing house Sarony, Major and Knapp, consolidated multiple smaller printers, including George S. Harris and Sons, Heppenheimer's and Sons, the Donaldson Brothers Company, the Giles Company, Eddy and Calaus, Witsch and Schmitt, and Schumacher and Ettinger, into the first American printing conglomerate. The consolidation was most likely a hedge to control the lucrative cigar label printing industry. Nonetheless, the American Lithographic Company became a major force in American printing, producing a wealth of printed materials until about 1929, when their assents were liquidated.

Condition


Very good. Some tape on verso, top margin, associated with previous framing.