1721 De Wit Map of the Netherlands (Holland)

ComitatusHollandiae-dewit-1721
$500.00
Comitatus Hollandiae tabula Pluribus Locis Recens.
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1721 De Wit Map of the Netherlands (Holland)

ComitatusHollandiae-dewit-1721

Detailed map of Netherlands dating to the early 18th century.
$500.00

Title


Comitatus Hollandiae tabula Pluribus Locis Recens.
  1721 (undated)    18.5 x 22.5 in (46.99 x 57.15 cm)     1 : 300000

Description


A beautiful c.1721 map of Holland or the Netherlands by Frederik De Wit. Oriented with north on the right, the map extends from modern day Goeree-Overflakkee north to Texel and inland as far as Wageningen depicting Utrecht and parts of Friesland and Brabant. An inset in the lower left quadrant features the West Frisian Islands. The map is superbly detailed, offering both topographical and political information, including roads, lakes, and rivers with mountains beautifully rendered in profile. Coastal features are also noted. Several ships can be seen sailing in the North Sea and the Zuiderzee.

An elegant title cartouche featuring mermen pulling a sea chariot with the Dutch coat of arms held by a cherub is featured in the top right quadrant. The map was issued by Covens and Mortier and printed shortly following their 1721 acquisition of De Wit's plates from Maria De Wit.

CartographerS


Frederik de Wit (1629 - 1706) was a Dutch Golden Age cartographer active in the second half of the 17th and the early 18th centuries. De Wit was born of middle class Protestant stock in the western Netherlandish town of Gouda. He relocated to Amsterdam sometime before 1648, when his first engraved map, a plan of Haarlem for Antonius Sanderus' Flandria Illustrata, is recorded. The first chart that De Wit personally both drew and engraved was most likely his 1659 map of Denmark, REGNI DANIÆ Accuratissima delineatio Perfeckte Kaerte van ‘t CONJNCKRYCK DENEMARCKEN . His great wall map of the world and most famous work, Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula appeared one year later. Following the publication of his wall map De Wit quickly rose in prominence as a both cartographer and engraver. He married Maria van der Way in 1661 and through her became a citizen of Amsterdam in 1662. Around this time he also published his first major atlas, a composite production ranging in size from 17 to over 150 maps and charts. Other atlases and individual maps followed. In 1689 De Wit was granted at 15 year Privilege by the Dutch States General. The Privilege was a kind of early copyright that protected his exclusive rights to print and publish his maps. He was recognized with the honorific 'Good Citizen' in 1694. De Wit died in 1706 after which his wife Maria continued publishing his maps until about 1710. Though De Wit did have a son, Franciscus, he had no interest in the map trade, being a prosperous stockfish merchant. Instead, on her own retirement, Maria sold most De Wit maps and plates at a public auction. Most were acquired by Pieter Mortier and laid the groundwork for the 1721 rise of Covens and Mortier, the largest Dutch cartographic publishing house of the 18th century.


Covens and Mortier (1721 - c. 1862). The Amsterdam publishing firm of Covens and Mortier was the successor to the extensive publishing empire built by Frenchman Pierre Mortier (1661 - 1711). Upon Mortier's death in 1711 his firm was taken over by his son, Cornelius Mortier (1699 - 1783). Cornelius married the sister of Johannes Covens (1697 - 1774) in 1821 and, partnering with his brother in law, established the Covens and Mortier firm. Under the Covens and Mortier imprint, Cornelius and Pierre republished the works of the great 17th and early 18th century Dutch and French cartographers De L'Isle, Allard, Jansson, De Wit, and Ottens among others. They quickly became one of the largest and most prolific Dutch publishing concerns of the 18th century. The firm and its successors published thousands of maps over a 120 year period from 1721 to the mid-1800s. During their long lifespan the Covens and Mortier firm published as Covens and Mortier (1721-1778), J. Covens and Son (1778 - 94) and Mortier, Covens and Son (1794 - c. 1862).

Condition


Very good. Overall age toning. Verso repair over split along original centerfold. Stain over top margin near centerfold. Some spotting throughout.

References


OCLC: 768930881.