1743 Homann Heirs Map of the 1741 Battle of Prague (Praha)

FrenchSiegeofPrague-homannheirs-1743
$675.00
Kriegs - Expeditions - Karte in Böhmen I. Blat, in welchem die Haubtstadt PRAG mit des Französsischen und Sæchsischen Belagerūg und Eroberung, So den 26 Novembre 1741. geschehen, vor gestellet wird. Ans Licht gestellt von Homæn Erben. A1743. / Carte des Expeditions de Guerre en Boheme, I. Feuille, dans laquelle se voit le Plan de la Ville de PRAGUE, assiegeé et prise par les Troupes auxiliaires de France et de Saxe en l'An 1741, le 26 Novembre. mise au jour par les Heritiers de Homan. l'An 1743.
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1743 Homann Heirs Map of the 1741 Battle of Prague (Praha)

FrenchSiegeofPrague-homannheirs-1743

An innovative battle for Prague fought during the War of the Austrian Succession.
$675.00

Title


Kriegs - Expeditions - Karte in Böhmen I. Blat, in welchem die Haubtstadt PRAG mit des Französsischen und Sæchsischen Belagerūg und Eroberung, So den 26 Novembre 1741. geschehen, vor gestellet wird. Ans Licht gestellt von Homæn Erben. A1743. / Carte des Expeditions de Guerre en Boheme, I. Feuille, dans laquelle se voit le Plan de la Ville de PRAGUE, assiegeé et prise par les Troupes auxiliaires de France et de Saxe en l'An 1741, le 26 Novembre. mise au jour par les Heritiers de Homan. l'An 1743.
  1743 (dated)    20.5 x 23.5 in (52.07 x 59.69 cm)     1 : 21000

Description


This is a 1743 Homann Heirs map of Prague or Praha. Created as the first in a series of maps illustrating events during the War of the Austrian Succession, the map depicts the walled city of Prague at its center along with the surrounding territory. Beautifully engraved and highly detailed, twenty-one different locations relating to the 1741 Battle of Prague are alphanumerically identified. These labeled locations correspond to an index situated in the upper left corner in a decorative cartouche. Other locations are labeled, such as the King's Regiment (Regiment du Roy) and the Bavarian Regiment (Royal Baviere), and the Royal Artillery (Royal Artillerie) near the left border. Other positions taken up by French and Bavarian troops are illustrated all around the city, with the Bavarian positions shaded in blue and the French positions shaded in red. Several abbeys and chapels are illustrated, along with a zoo (Thiergarten), other gardens, and a hospital. A diagram along the right border depicts the profile of the city walls in seven different locations around Prague. An inset map in the lower right corner illustrates the same region one year later, when the French were besieged in Prague by the Austrians and alphabetically labels twenty-six different locations throughout the map. A second inset map, in the lower left corner, provides a wider view of the region, illustrating French and Bavarian positions during the siege.

The Battle of Prague – November 1741

The War of the Austrian Succession was fought over the question of Maria Theresa's succession to the Habsburg Monarchy. During the war, the Prussians invaded Silesia with the goal of annexing that territory. France, fearful that the Prussians would gain incredible amounts of territory, entered the war on the Prussian side in support of the claim of Elector Charles Albert of Bavaria to the Austrian thrown. Supported by Bavarian and Saxon soldiers, the French army initially marched on Vienna before abruptly changing course and invading Bohemia. This column, which the Austrians could not find, advanced on Prague, the capital of Bohemia. Led by the intelligent and experienced Maurice de Saxe, he and a small party reconnoitered Prague and were able to recognize where they had an advantage. Saxe sent his most competent (and boldest) officer, Colonel François de Chevert, to assault the walls at night. During the night of 25-26 November, Chevert and his men employed ladders to scale a parapet and capture a section of the walls. They then opened the Prague's gate for Saxe's cavalry, leaving the city's defenders no choice but surrender.

This map was drawn by Lieutenant Meyer of the Artillery, and the inset map in the lower right was drawn by a French engineer named Sinsart. The whole was compiled and published by Homann Heirs in 1743.

Cartographer


Johann Baptist Homann (March 20, 1664 - July 1, 1724) was the most prominent and prolific map publisher of the 18th century. Homann was born in Oberkammlach, a small town near Kammlach, Bavaria, Germany. As a young man Homann studied in a Jesuit school and nursed ambitions of becoming a Dominican priest before converting to Protestantism in 1687. Following his conversion, Homann moved to Nuremberg and found employment as a notary. Around 1693 Homan briefly relocated to Vienna, where he lived and studied printing and copper plate engraving until 1695. Afterwards he returned to Nuremberg where, in 1702, he founded the commercial publishing firm that would bear his name. In the next five years Homann produced hundreds of maps and developed a distinctive style characterized by heavy detailed engraving, elaborate allegorical cartouche work, and vivid hand color. The Homann firm, due to the lower cost of printing in Germany, was able to undercut the dominant French and Dutch publishing houses while matching the diversity and quality of their output. By 1715 Homann's rising star caught the attention of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the VI, who appointed him Imperial Cartographer. In the same year he was also appointed a member of the Royal Academy of Sciences in Berlin. Homann's prestigious title came with a number of important advantages including access to the most up to date cartographic information as well as the "Privilege". The Privilege was a type of early copyright offered to a few individuals by the Holy Roman Emperor. Though not as sophisticated as modern copyright legislation, the Privilege did offer a kind of limited protection for several years. Most all J. B. Homann maps printed between 1715 and 1730 bear the inscription "Cum Priviligio" or some variation. Following Homann's death in 1726, the management of the firm passed to his son Johann Christoph Homann (1703 - 1730). J. C. Homann, perhaps realizing that he would not long survive his father, stipulated in his will that the company would be inherited by his two head managers, Johann Georg Ebersberger and Johann Michael Franz, and that it would publish only under the name Homann Heirs. This designation, in various forms (Homannsche Heirs, Heritiers de Homann, Lat Homannianos Herod, Homannschen Erben, etc..) appears on maps from about 1731 onwards. The firm continued to publish maps in ever diminishing quantities until the death of its last owner, Christoph Franz Fembo in 1848.

Condition


Very good. Even overall toning. Verso repairs of centerfold separations. Verso repairs of margin tears. Blank on verso.

References


OCLC 248611820.
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