1827 Vandermaelen Map of Gujarat and Western Maharashtra State

GujaratMumbai-vandermaelen-1827
$550.00
Guzerate, Chandeish et Aurungabad. Asie no. 93. - Main View
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1827 Vandermaelen Map of Gujarat and Western Maharashtra State

GujaratMumbai-vandermaelen-1827

First lithograph map of Guzarat and the region around Mumbai, India.
$550.00

Title


Guzerate, Chandeish et Aurungabad. Asie no. 93.
  1827 (undated)     18.25 x 23 in (46.355 x 58.42 cm)     1 : 1641836

Description


This is the 1827 Vandermaelen map of the Indian province of Gujarat, and the coastal part of what is now Maharashtra. It is the first large-scale atlas map to focus on the area, and the first to be executed in lithography. It includes the cities of Mumbai (Bombay on the map,) Surat (Soorut,) and Bhuj (Bhooj.) In the north, it shows part of the Great Rann of Kutch (the massive salt marsh in the Thar Desert) and extends as far south as Mhasala (Mheysala). The eastern reaches of the map include the cities of Ahmednagar, Aurangabad, and Indore in Madhya Pradesh. Topography is pictorial, illustrating the mountains and wetlands with hachures. Vandermaelen appears to have drawn heavily, but not universally, from the maps of Aaron Arrowsmith to inform his work here.
Publication History
This map appeared in the second part, 'Asie,' of Vandermaelen's Atlas universel de géographie physique, politique, statistique et minéralogique. The atlas was produced in one edition in 1827; only 810 complete sets were sold. The full set of six volumes appears in eleven institutional collections in OCLC; the 2nd volume alone is listed in 12. Although digitally catalogued via the Rumsey collection, this separate map does not appear physically in any listing in OCLC.

CartographerS


Philippe Marie Guillaume Vandermaelen (December 23, 1795 - May 29, 1869) was a Flemish cartographer active in Brussels during the first part of the 19th century. Vandermaelen is created with "one of the most remarkable developments of private enterprise in cartography," namely his remarkable six volume Atlas Universel de Geographie. Vandermaelen was born in Brussels in 1795 and trained as a globe maker. It was no doubt his training as a globe maker that led him see the need for an atlas rendered on a universal scale in order that all bodies could be understood in relation to one another. In addition to his great work Vandermaelen also produced a number of globes, lesser maps, a highly detail 250 sheet map of Belgium, and several regional atlases. Learn More...


Aaron Arrowsmith (1750-1823), John Arrowsmith (1790-1873), and Samuel Arrowsmith. The Arrowsmith family were noted map engravers, publishers, geographers, and cartographers active in the late 18th and early 19th century. The Arrowsmith firm was founded by Aaron Arrowsmith, who was trained in surveying and engraving under John Cary and William Faden. Arrowsmith founded the Arrowsmith firm as a side business while employed by Cary. The firm specialized in large format individual issue maps containing the most up to date and sophisticated information available. Arrowsmith's work drew the attention of the Prince of Wales who, in 1810, named him Hydrographer to the Prince of Wales, and subsequently, in 1820, Hydrographer to the King. Aaron Arrowsmith was succeeded by two sons, Aaron and Samuel, who followed him in the map publication business. The Arrowsmith firm eventually fell to John Arrowsmith (1790-1873), nephew of the elder Aaron. John was a founding member of the Royal Geographical Society. The firm is best known for their phenomenal large format mappings of North America. Mount Arrowsmith, situated east of Port Alberni on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, is named for Aaron Arrowsmith and his nephew John Arrowsmith. Learn More...

Source


Vandermaelen, P., Atlas universel de geographie physique, politique, statistique et mineralogique, (Bruxelles: Vandermaelen) 1827.     Atlas Universel de Geographie. This great work, featuring some 378 unique maps and compiled over three years, was the first lithograph atlas, and the first to render the world on the same projection and at a uniform scale. It was no doubt Vandermaelen’s training a globe maker that led him see the need for an atlas rendered uniformly so that all bodies could be understood in relation to one another. As a result, many newly emerging areas received more attention than prior efforts. Maps of the American West, in particular, benefited: ‘no mapmaker had previously attempted to use such a large scale for any western American area.’ (Wheat). Central and South Asia also appear in sharper focus. Despite Vandermaelen’s reliance upon existing sources, his maps very frequently provided the clearest depictions available of many poorly-understood parts of the world. The atlas was an expensive production, costing $800 in 1827. Subscription lists indicate that only 810 full sets of the atlas were sold. It was printed on high-quality paper with superior hand coloring and was engraved in a clear, legible style. Conjoined, the maps of Vendermaelen's atlas would create a massive globe some 7.75 meters in diameter, a feat which was accomplished at the Etablissement Geographique de Brussels.

Condition


Very good. Original outline color, wide margins and no repairs.

References


Rumsey 2212.125.