1870 Brue and Levasseur Pocket Map of Italy

Italy-brue-1870
$350.00
Carte Physique et Politique de L'Italie dela Region des Alpes et des ProvincesAutrichiennes sur L'Adriatique.
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1870 Brue and Levasseur Pocket Map of Italy

Italy-brue-1870


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Title


Carte Physique et Politique de L'Italie dela Region des Alpes et des ProvincesAutrichiennes sur L'Adriatique.
  1870 (undated)    28.5 x 21 in (72.39 x 53.34 cm)

Description


This is A. Brue's c. 1870 map of Italy. Covers the entire peninsula of Italy including the Sicily, Corsica and Sardinia. Extends north to include Switzerland and parts of Austria and Bavaria. Shows shipping routes between Italy and North Africa, as well as to other European nations. Issued in linen backed folding format as map no. 30 of A. Brue and Emile Levasseur's c. 1870 Atlas Universel en 67 Feuilles

CartographerS


Victor Levasseur, an important French engineer, cartographer, and engraver of the mid 19th century, held a number of important cartographically related political and educations posts in France. He is most famous for his Atlas National Illustré des 86 Départements et des Possessions de La France, a large decorative atlas of France, including his Planisphere and five important continental maps. Levasseur's maps are distinctive for their wide decorative margins containing elaborate depictions of the scenery, peoples, and trade goods of the areas he mapped. Levasseur maps are also known to offer a wealth of statistical data. Until recently, very few Levasseur Atlases migrated out of France where they were mostly used in public libraries and town halls. His work represents some of the last great decorative atlases of the 19th century.


Adrien-Hubert Brue (1786 - 1832) was a French cartographer active in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Brue held the office of Geographe du Roi and often signed his maps as such. In this position Brue contributed to thousands of maps and numerous atlases. Like most cartographers many of his maps were published posthumously and were common even several decades after his death.kable clarity and accuracy. Brué eventually acquired the prestigious office of Geographe du Roi and often signed his maps as such. In this position Brue contributed to thousands of maps and numerous atlases. Like most cartographers many of his maps were published posthumously by his partner, Charles Picquet's son and heir, Pierre-Jacques Picquet, and were still being updated and republished decades after his death.

Source


Levasseur, E., Atlas Universel en 67 Feuilles, c. 1870.    

Condition


Very good. Light toning on original folds. Dissected and mounted on original linen in 16 sections.