1729 Van Der Aa View of Moscow, Russia

LaVilleDeMoscou-vanderaa-1729
$1,700.00
La Ville de Moscou, Capitale de la Moscovie.
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1729 Van Der Aa View of Moscow, Russia

LaVilleDeMoscou-vanderaa-1729

Dramatic view of Moscow in the early 18th century.

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Title


La Ville de Moscou, Capitale de la Moscovie.
  1729 (undated)    12 x 20 in (30.48 x 50.8 cm)

Description


This is a beautiful 1729 view of Moscow by Pieter Van der Aa. It depicts the capital of the Tsardom of Russia, Moscow, as it appeared in the early 18th century. Features the countryside in the foreground with shepherds and cattle herders along with hunters. In the distance, the fortified city can be seen with individual buildings clearly identifiable. The most important of these are further identified by a key in top left quadrant and along the bottom of the view.

This view is based on a draft by Nicolaes Witsen, Dutch statesman and mayor of Amsterdam and considered an expert on Russian affairs at the time. This view was engraved in Leiden by Pieter (Pierre) van der Aa.

CartographerS


Pieter van der Aa (1659 - 1733) was a Dutch publisher of maps and atlases active in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Van der Aa was born in Leyden in 1659. At nine he was apprenticed to a local bookseller and, by 21, had established his own publishing, printing, and auctioneering house. In 1692 Van der Aa was appointed to be one of the High Commissioners of the Booksellers Guild. During his long and impressive career Van der Aa produced thousands of maps, including a vast 28 volume atlas containing no less than 3,000 maps. Few of Van der Aa's maps were original productions, most being copied from the work of earlier cartographers. Nonetheless, when one of Van der Aa's rare original pieces does appear, his style, with unusual projections, elegant engraving, and precise detail, is instantly recognizable and highly desirable. He also pioneered the cartographic idea of separating border artwork from the map plate itself such that every map in a collection could have a similar elaborate border without actually having to re-engrave the complex plates. This technique was used to great effect by later 18th century publishers like Brion de la Tour. Following Van der Aa's death in 1733, his much admired Nouvel Atlas was reissued by the Dutch firm of Covens & Mortier. Today Van der Aa's work is admired for its fine delicate engraving and unusual projections and is considered highly desirable among collectors.


Nicolaes Witsen (May 8, 1641 - August 10, 1717) was a Dutch cartographer, diplomat, writer, businessman, and politician. Witsen was born in Amsterdam to the politically powerful Cornelius Jan Witsen, burgomaster, head bailiff and administrator of the Dutch West India Company. Witsen studied Law at the University of Leiden where he developed an interest in language and maps. He was highly educated and traveled in elite circle, befriending Oliver Cromwell, Andrew Vinius, Cosimo III de'Medici, Melchisédech Thévenot, and others. In 1662 he presented a paper at the Amsterdam Athenaeum Illustre arguing for the effect of comets on earthly life. Witsen joined the VOC (Dutch East India Company) became an expert on shipbuilding, composing several treatises on the subject. His passion, however, remained cartography, particularly the cartography of Asia. Having traveled in embassy to Russia, Witsen contrived to get special access to Russian records on the exploration of Siberia, including the heretofore unknown explorations of Semyon Dezhnev. He also acquired the diary of Maarten Gerritsz Vries, who had explored the coast of Sahkalin in 1643. The Vries diary was thereafter lost. This information he compiled into several influential maps and books on Asia which were extensively copied. One result of this work is the Witsen Peninsula - a narrow outcropping of land extending from Siberia that appears on many maps of the early 17th century. Later Witsen became Mayor of Amsterdam, a position he held some 13 times, and under whose tenure arts flourished. Witsen died in Amsterdam and was buried near his country home in Egmond aan den Hoef.

Source


Olaerius, A, Voyages tres-curieux et tres-renommez faits en Moscovie, Tartarie et Perse, (Leiden: van der Aa) 1729.    

Condition


Very good. Minor wear along original fold lines with some toning along right fold. Minor spotting. Dark Impression.