1690 Valk and Schenk Map of Virginia and the Chesapeake (Hondius / Smith)

NovaVirginiaeTabula-valkschenk-1694
$1,900.00
Nova Virginiae Tabula.
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1690 Valk and Schenk Map of Virginia and the Chesapeake (Hondius / Smith)

NovaVirginiaeTabula-valkschenk-1694

The scarce last derivative of Smith's map of Virginia.

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Title


Nova Virginiae Tabula.
  1694 (undated)    15.5 x 20 in (39.37 x 50.8 cm)     1 : 1680000

Description


A fine example of the scarce c. 1694 Schenk and Valk map of Virginia and the Chesapeake Bay. Oriented to the west, this map covers from Cape Henry to the Susquehanna River and inland as far as the Appellation Mountains. The Chesapeake Bay is shown in full as are many of its river estuaries, though topographically this map places a number of mountain ranges where there are in fact none. Cartographically this map the second state (Valk and Schenk) of the 5th derivative (Hondius, 1618) of John Smith's landmark map of the Virginia colony issued in 1612. Smith's fine cartographic work, as well as reports from indigenous American Indian tribes, and fanciful wishful thinking, combine to make this one of the most interesting maps of America to emerge in the 17th century. Philip D. Burden, the author of The Mapping of America, considers this map, Nova Virginiae Tabula, to be
one of the most important maps of America ever produced and certainly one of the greatest influence.
He further states, of this specific edition,
In 1694 Petrus Schenk acquired all of the Atlas Major plates at public auction from the heirs of Jansson van Waesberge, and began issuing the maps with his own imprint. This last state of the map [State 2] is uncommon and has no text on the reverse.
The primary differences between this state of the map and previous states are the incorporation of longitude and latitude lines and the inclusion of a Virginia border. It is alto typically vividly colored in a 17th century hand.

To fully understand this map one must first realize that most Europeans believed the Pacific, or at least some great bay that led to the Pacific, lay just a few days travel inland. In the minds of most Europeans of the period, the trade potential for the Virginia colony was entirely dependent upon it being a practical access point to the riches of Asia. Thus the significance of large apparent body of water appearing in the land of the Massawomecks, in the upper right quadrant, becomes clear. Of course, much of this land was entirely unexplored by the European settlers in Jamestown, shown here on the Powhatan River (James River), who relied heavily upon American Indian reports for much of their cartographic knowledge of the Virginia hinterlands. The Masawomecks themselves were a rival of the Powhatan and made their home near the headwaters of the Potomac. These, like many other indigenous groups of the region made only a brief and frequently violent appearance during the 17th century before entirely disappearing, mostly from disease and war, in the early 18th century.

In the upper left quadrant there is an image of the American Indian chief of the Powhatan sitting enthroned before a great fire in his long house. One of the more popular legends regarding John Smith was is capture and trial before the chief of the Powahatan. Smith was convinced that his liberation had something to do with the youthful daughter of Chief Powahatan, Pocahontas, taking a liking to him. Though this grew into a fictitious legend of its own, the truth is more likely that Powhatan saw Smith and his Englishmen as potential allies against the rival American Indian groups, such as the Massawomecks, that were pressing hard against his borders.

There are a number of different editions of this map and its publication by various map houses in various states made it the first widely distributed map of the Virginia colony and of John Smith's important map. There was, however, a scandal relating to its publication. The map was originally drawn and engraved in 1618 by Jodocus Hondius based upon the first edition of John Smith's 1612 map. When Jodocus died in 1629, he and his brother, Henricus Hondius, while collaborating on the Hondius Atlas Major, had established and maintained separate business for some 10 years. Jodocus' death enabled the competing cartographer, Willem Blaeu to acquire a large number of Jodocus' map plates, which he promptly published in 1630 as the Atlantis Appendix. Henricus, in the meantime, had been counting on Jodocus' new plates to enhance his own, by then outdated, Hondius Atlas Major. A surviving contract dated March 2, 1630 reveals that Henricus Hondius and his partner Joannes Janssonius hired engravers to produce a number of new map plates copying the work of Jodocus – now in the hands of the Blaeu firm. This map was among the most important on that list and accounts for the quantity of variants of this map issued by competing Blaeu and Hondius firms.

This particular edition is known for being the only example of this map in which the American Indian at the right of the map is facing the Chesapeake Bay. Moreover, it is the last published map to follow the Smith/Hondius model. An essential map for Virginia collectors.

CartographerS


Gerard Valk was a Dutch engraver, globe maker, and map publisher active in Amsterdam in the latter half of the 17th century. He studied mathematics, navigation, and cartographer under Pieter Maasz Smit. He later worked in London for the map sellers Christopher Browne and David Loggan. In 1687 he established his own firm in Amsterdam in partnership with Petrus (Pieter) Schenk, who married his sister in the same year. They published under the imprint of Valk and Schenk. Initially they published maps and atlas, acquiring the map plates of Jodocus Hondius in 1794. Later, in 1701 they moved into the from Hondius offices where they began producing globes. Valk and Schenk quickly became known for producing the best globes in the Netherlands, a business on which they held a near monopoly for nearly 50 years. He joined the bookseller's guide in 1711. Around the same time Gerard introduced his son, Leonard, to the business. Leonard was nowhere near as sophisticated a cartographer as his father and ultimately, through neglect, lost much the firm's prestige. After his death the firm was taken over by his widow Maria.


Petrus (Pieter) Schenk (1661 - 1711) was a Dutch engraver, globe maker, and map publisher active in Amsterdam in the latter half of the 17th century. In 1687 he established his own firm in Amsterdam in partnership with Gerard Valk, whose sister he married in the same year. They published under the imprint of Valk and Schenk. Initially they published maps and atlas, acquiring the map plates of Jodocus Hondius in 1794. Later, in 1701 they moved into the from Hondius offices where they began producing globes. Valk and Schenk quickly became known for producing the best globes in the Netherlands, a business on which they held a near monopoly for nearly 50 years. He joined the bookseller's guide in 1711. Around the same time Gerard introduced his son, Leonard, to the business. Leonard was nowhere near as sophisticated a cartographer as his father and ultimately, through neglect, lost much the firm's prestige. After his death the firm was taken over by his widow Maria.


Jodocus Hondius (October, 14 1563 - February 12, 1612) was an important Dutch cartographer active in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. His common name, Jodocus Hondius is actually a Latinized version of his Dutch name, Joost de Hondt. He is also sometimes referred to as Jodocus Hondius the Elder to distinguish him from his sons. Hondius was a Flemish artist, engraver, and cartographer. He is best known for his early maps of the New World and Europe, for re-establishing the reputation of the work of Gerard Mercator, and for his portraits of Francis Drake. Hondius was born and raised in Ghent. In his early years he established himself as an engraver, instrument maker and globe maker. In 1584 he moved to London to escape religious difficulties in Flanders. During his stay in England, Hondius was instrumental in publicizing the work of Francis Drake, who had made a circumnavigation of the world in the late 1570s. In particular, in 1589 Hondius produced a now famous map of the cove of New Albion, where Drake briefly established a settlement on the west coast of North America. Hondius' map was based on journal and eyewitness accounts of the trip and has long fueled speculation about the precise location of Drake's landing, which has not yet been firmly established by historians. Hondius is also thought to be the artist of several well-known portraits of Drake that are now in the National Portrait Gallery in London. In 1593 Hondius returned to Amsterdam, where he remained until the end of his life. In 1604 he purchased the plates of Gerard Mercator's Atlas from Mercator's grandson. Mercator's work had languished in comparison to the rival atlas, Theatrum Orbis Terrarum by Ortelius. Hondius republished Mercator's work with 36 additional maps, including several which he himself produced. Despite the addition of his own contributions, Hondius recognizing the prestige of Mercator's name, gave Mercator full credit as the author of the work, listing himself as the publisher. Hondius' new edition of Mercator's revived the great cartographer's reputation was a great success, selling out after a year. Hondius later published a second edition, as well as a pocket version called the Atlas Minor. The maps have since become known as the "Mercator/Hondius series". Between 1605 and 1610 Hondius was employed by John Speed to engrave the plates for Speed's The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine. Following Hondius' death in 1612, his publishing work in Amsterdam was continued by his widow and two sons, Jodocus II and Henricus. Later his family formed a partnership with Jan Jansson, whose name appears on the Atlas as co-publisher after 1633. Eventually, starting with the first 1606 edition in Latin, about 50 editions of the Atlas were released in the main European languages. In the Islamic world, the atlas was partially translated by the Turkish scholar Katip Çelebi. The series is sometimes called the "Mercator/Hondius/Jansson" series because of Jansson's later contributions. Hondius' is also credited wth a number of important cartographic innovations including the introduction of decorative map border and the evolution of the 17th centruy Dutch wall map. The work of Hondius was essential to the establishment Amsterdam as the center of cartography in Europe in the 17th century.

Condition


Very good. Original centerfold. Wide original margins. Platemark visible. Old Color. Blank on verso.

References


OCLC 60806160. Burden, P., The Mapping of America: A List of Printed Maps, 1151-1670, 228. Verner, Coolie, Map Collector's Circle # 45, 33-34. Verner, Coolie, 'Maps of Virginia in Mercator's Lesser Atlases', Image Mundi XVII, 45-61.