1762 Homann Heirs Map of Sicily, Sardenia, Corsica and Malta (ITALY)

RegniSicilia-homannheirs-1762
$950.00
Li Regni di Sicilia e Sardegna colle Adiacenti Isole di Corsica, Elba, Malta e Liparee, o di Vulcano, non men che parte delle spiagge settentrionali dell'Africa e delle Meridionali d'Italia, Rappresentate Idro- Geograficamente e all'esattezza la più possibile, stante la legittima loro Situazione nel Mediterraneo sotto la Supposizione dei grandi stabiliti dagl'Eccmiss.mi della Reial Accademia delle Scienze, proporzionata al Graduato Globo Terraqueo: ridotta alla desiderata Perfezione dai Viaggi e dalla composizione fattane dal Sig. e G.A.B. Rizzi Zannoni N. Padovano Professore di Geografia nella spettabile Società Cosmografica di Norimbergo, A spese degl'Eredi d'Homann MDCCLXII.
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1762 Homann Heirs Map of Sicily, Sardenia, Corsica and Malta (ITALY)

RegniSicilia-homannheirs-1762


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Title


Li Regni di Sicilia e Sardegna colle Adiacenti Isole di Corsica, Elba, Malta e Liparee, o di Vulcano, non men che parte delle spiagge settentrionali dell'Africa e delle Meridionali d'Italia, Rappresentate Idro- Geograficamente e all'esattezza la più possibile, stante la legittima loro Situazione nel Mediterraneo sotto la Supposizione dei grandi stabiliti dagl'Eccmiss.mi della Reial Accademia delle Scienze, proporzionata al Graduato Globo Terraqueo: ridotta alla desiderata Perfezione dai Viaggi e dalla composizione fattane dal Sig. e G.A.B. Rizzi Zannoni N. Padovano Professore di Geografia nella spettabile Società Cosmografica di Norimbergo, A spese degl'Eredi d'Homann MDCCLXII.
  1762 (dated)    19 x 22.5 in (48.26 x 57.15 cm)

Description


This is one of the Homann Heirs finest and most appealing maps of southern Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. Covers the region from Corsica and the boot of Italy south to Tunisia and North Africa. Includes the island of Malta in the lower right quadrant. Lower left quadrant offers an elaborate title cartouche with a sailing ship, armorial shields of Sicily, Sardinia and Malta, and a warrior, possibly Persus, bearing Medusa shield. Geographically speaking, the map is generally accurate though the coastlines do indicate some improvements and updates over previous Homann maps. Rougly translated the lengthy title reads: The Kingdoms of Sicily and Sardinia with Adjacent Island of Corsica, Elba, Malta and Liparee or Vulcano, and the beaches of Northern Africa and Southern Italy. Represented as geographically accurate as possible, bearing on their legitimate situation in the Mediterranean under the supposition of established geography of the Reial Acadmey of Sciences, proportional to the graduated globe of the Earth; reduced to the desired size and composition by Mr. G. A. B. Rizzi Zannoni, Professor of Geography of the Cosmographic Company of Nuremburg, for the Heirs of Homann MDCCLXII. This map was drawn by G. A. b. Rizzi Zannoni N. Padovano for inclusion the 1752 Homann Heirs Maior Atlas Scholasticus ex Triginta Sex Generalibus et Specialibus…. Most early Homann atlases were 'made to order' or compiled of individual maps at the request of the buyer. However, this rare atlas, composed of 37 maps and charts, was issued as a 'suggested collection' of essential Homann Heirs maps. A fine copy of an important map.

Cartographer


Johann Baptist Homann (March 20, 1664 - July 1, 1724) was the most prominent and prolific map publisher of the 18th century. Homann was born in Oberkammlach, a small town near Kammlach, Bavaria, Germany. As a young man Homann studied in a Jesuit school and nursed ambitions of becoming a Dominican priest before converting to Protestantism in 1687. Following his conversion, Homann moved to Nuremberg and found employment as a notary. Around 1693 Homan briefly relocated to Vienna, where he lived and studied printing and copper plate engraving until 1695. Afterwards he returned to Nuremberg where, in 1702, he founded the commercial publishing firm that would bear his name. In the next five years Homann produced hundreds of maps and developed a distinctive style characterized by heavy detailed engraving, elaborate allegorical cartouche work, and vivid hand color. The Homann firm, due to the lower cost of printing in Germany, was able to undercut the dominant French and Dutch publishing houses while matching the diversity and quality of their output. By 1715 Homann's rising star caught the attention of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the VI, who appointed him Imperial Cartographer. In the same year he was also appointed a member of the Royal Academy of Sciences in Berlin. Homann's prestigious title came with a number of important advantages including access to the most up to date cartographic information as well as the "Privilege". The Privilege was a type of early copyright offered to a few individuals by the Holy Roman Emperor. Though not as sophisticated as modern copyright legislation, the Privilege did offer a kind of limited protection for several years. Most all J. B. Homann maps printed between 1715 and 1730 bear the inscription "Cum Priviligio" or some variation. Following Homann's death in 1726, the management of the firm passed to his son Johann Christoph Homann (1703 - 1730). J. C. Homann, perhaps realizing that he would not long survive his father, stipulated in his will that the company would be inherited by his two head managers, Johann Georg Ebersberger and Johann Michael Franz, and that it would publish only under the name Homann Heirs. This designation, in various forms (Homannsche Heirs, Heritiers de Homann, Lat Homannianos Herod, Homannschen Erben, etc..) appears on maps from about 1731 onwards. The firm continued to publish maps in ever diminishing quantities until the death of its last owner, Christoph Franz Fembo in 1848.

Condition


Very Good condition. Very minor centerfold discoloration. Blank on verso.

References


Phillips, Lee Philip, A List of Geographical Atlases in the Library of Congress, page 44.