1780 Bowles and Carver Map of the North Atlantic, Pacific Northwest, and Siberia (Alaska)

RussianDiscoveries-bowles-1780
$1,500.00
Bowles's New Pocket Map of the Discoveries made by the Russians on the North West Coast of America Published by the Royal Academy of Sciences at Petersburg.
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1780 Bowles and Carver Map of the North Atlantic, Pacific Northwest, and Siberia (Alaska)

RussianDiscoveries-bowles-1780

Unusual early map of the North Atlantic.

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Title


Bowles's New Pocket Map of the Discoveries made by the Russians on the North West Coast of America Published by the Royal Academy of Sciences at Petersburg.
  1780 (undated)    19 x 25 in (48.26 x 63.5 cm)     1 : 16000000

Description


A scarce Bowles and Carver example of Thomas Jeffery's seminal map of the North Atlantic, including th Pacific Northwest, Alasaka, and northeastern Asia. The map covers from the Arctic Circle south to the latitudes of Vancouver and Japan. Jeffreys' intended this map to illustrate the explorations of Bering and Tschirkow, several anonymous Russian Voyages, and the travels of the Cossack Schestakow and Captain Panlutzki overland through Siberia. The western coast of the America's is particularly interesting - especially the uncanny Alaska-like projection extending westward towards Asia. Apparently this map was intended as a pocket map, but the present example is offered in folio form.

Cartographer


The Bowles family ( fl. c. 1714 - 1832 ) were publishers and map sellers active in London from c. 1714 to c. 1832. The firm, under Thomas Bowles ( fl. 1714 - 1763), John Bowles (1701-1779), Carrington Bowles (1724 - 1793), and as Bowles and Carver (fl. 1794 - 1832), produced a massive corpus of work that included numerous atlases, pocket maps , and wall maps. The Bowles publishing tradition was kept alive over four generations starting with Thomas Bowles who was a print engraver in the late 17th century. The first maps issued by the firm were actually produced by his son, Thomas Bowles the second, who based in self in St. Paul's Churchyard, London. Thomas's brother, John Bowles (called "Old John Bowles" or "Black Horse Bowles" by those who knew his shop), was also an active publisher and was established at no. 13 Cornhill. It is said that he was one of the first publishers of William Hogarth's works. It was here that John's son, Carrington Bowles, was introduced to the trade. Carrington took over the Cornhill bookshop and eventually merged it with his uncles shop in St. Paul's Churchyard. On Carrington's death in 1793, the business was passed to his son Henry Carrington Bowles, who partnered with Samuel Carver, renaming the firm, Bowles and Carver. Under this imprint the firm continued to publish maps and atlases until the early 1830s.

Condition


Very good

References


OCLC: 82979387.