1580 Braun and Hogenberg View of Santander, Spain

Santander-braun-1580
$450.00
Santander.
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1580 Braun and Hogenberg View of Santander, Spain

Santander-braun-1580

Early view of an important Spanish port city in the Basque Region.
$450.00

Title


Santander.
  1580 (undated)    13.5 x 15 in (34.29 x 38.1 cm)

Description


This is a 1580 Georg Braun and Franz Hogenberg view of Santander, Spain. The view overlooks the town of Santander from one of the hills which presumably surrounds the city. The city and harbor are depicted in detail, illustrating individual buildings, the town church, and even individual fishing boats in the harbor! Large sailing ships dot the bay. Mountains and a large waterfall provide a backdrop, while townspeople in traditional dress occupy the foreground, along with their donkey. The fact that the harbor dominates the view alludes to the town's trading importance in the region of Cantabria.

This view was published in Civitates Orbis Terrarum by Braun and Hogenberg in 1580.

CartographerS


George Braun (1541 – March 10, 1622) was a German cleric and typo-geographer based in Cologne. Along with Franz Hogenberg, Braun is best known for his publication of the highly influential city atlas Civitates Orbis Terrarum. The six volume work, with some 546 views, was published between 1572 and 1617 and intended a companion to Abraham Ortelius' Thatrum Orbis Terrarum - thus certain obvious stylistic similarities. In compiling the Civitates Braun took on the role of editor while most of the engraving work was completed by Franz Hogenberg. Braun died, as he was born, in Cologne.


Frans Hogenberg (1535 - 1590), often called 'Master Franz,' was a Flemish engraver active in the late 16th century. Hogenberg was born in Mechelen, the sone of Nicolas Hogenberg, where he trained under the cartographer H. Terbruggen. He later relocated to Antwerp where he achieved success as an engraver, working with Abraham Ortelius, Hieronymus Cock, and others. In 1568, his name appeared on the list of those banned from the Netherlands by the Duke of Alva, forcing his family to flee to London. There he engraved for Christopher Saxon's Atlas of England and Wales. By 1570 he emigrated to Germany settling in Cologne. In Cologne he married his second wife, Agnes Lomar, with whom he had six children. In 1579 the couple were briefly imprisoned for holding illicit secret religious meetings, but were released in short order. Along with German cleric George Braun, Hogenberg issued the highly influential city atlas Civitates Orbis Terrarum. The six volume work, with some 546 views, was published between 1572 and 1617 and intended a companion to Abraham Ortelius' Thatrum Orbis Terrarum - thus certain obvious stylistic similarities. In compiling the Civitates Hogenberg took on the role of engraver while most of the editing was left to George Braun. Hogenberg died in Cologne, Germany, before the Civitates was completed. After his death, Hogenberg's work was continued by his son, Abraham Hogenberg, who, under the direction of Agnes, his mother, took over his father enterprise at just 20.

Source


Braun, G. and F. Hogenberg, Civitates Orbis Terrarum. (Antwerp) 1588.    

Condition


Very good. Text on verso.