1878 Krebs View of the National Soldiers Home, Dayton, Ohio

SoldiersHomeDayton-kreb-1878
$2,000.00
National Soldiers Home, Near Dayton, Ohio.
Processing...

1878 Krebs View of the National Soldiers Home, Dayton, Ohio

SoldiersHomeDayton-kreb-1878

The central office of the National Asylum for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, now the Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
$2,000.00

Title


National Soldiers Home, Near Dayton, Ohio.
  1878 (undated)    23 x 32 in (58.42 x 81.28 cm)

Description


A rare 1878 Adolph Krebs chromolithograph view of the National Soldier's Home (National Asylum for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers) near Dayton, Ohio. The view looks west and slightly north on the campus of the National Soldier's Home from a high point to the west of the Home, a region today called Highview Hills.

The National Soldier's Home was established in 1865 to provide care for the many soldiers who has been disabled through loss of limb, wounds, disease, or injury during service in the Union forces in the American Civil War. There were several branches, the branch here illustrated being the Central Branch, constructed in 1867, located near Dayton. Today it is the Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

This view is reasonably rare. The only other example we have been able to definitively identify is at the Library of Congress.

Cartographer


Adolph K. Krebs (1831–1884) was a Cincinnati, Ohio, lithographer active in the second Half of the 19th Century. His firms, Krebs Lithographic Company, was initially founded in 1856 as Ehrgott and Forbriger, after Peter E. Ehrgott and Adolphus F. Forbriger. When Forbirger died in 1869, Peter Ehrgott took on Krebs as a new partner. The name briefly changed to Ehgrott and Krebs. When Ehgrott retirned in 1874, it was renamed Krebs Lithographic Compnay. Krebs took on partners W. D. Henderson, and F. Veigel but maintained overall ownership and management of the company. Under Krebs the firm reached new heights, producing both lithographic and chromolithographic items, including bonds, checks, diplomas, drafts, maps, and views. The Cincinnati firm was based in the Carlisle Building, where, at their largest, they occupied two full floors.

Condition


Very good. Minor verso repairs and reinforcement. Fox mark top center.