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1846 Mitchell Map of Iowa (First Edition!)

Iowa2-mitchell-1846
$350.00
Iowa. - Main View
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1846 Mitchell Map of Iowa (First Edition!)

Iowa2-mitchell-1846

Depicts the short-lived 'neutral zone' between the Sioux and the Sauks and Foxes, negotiated by William Clark, half of the duo of Lewis and Clark.

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Title


Iowa.
  1846 (undated)     16.5 x 13.5 in (41.91 x 34.29 cm)     1 : 1400000

Description


This is a first edition 1846 Samuel Augustus Mitchell map of Iowa. The map depicts the region from central Iowa to Wisconsin and Illinois and from Lake St. Croix to Missouri. Only the extreme southeastern portion of the territory has been surveyed, with the familiar grid of the Public Land Survey System providing some organization. A handful of counties are illustrated, labeled, and shaded different colors to allow for easy differentiation. Iowa City and Dubuque are labeled, as are several other cities and towns. The rest of Iowa is divided between the Sioux, Sauks and Foxes, Iowas, and Pottawattamies. The only other land here is a 40-mile wide neutral zone of land that was purchased from the Sauk and the Sioux in an effort to establish territorial rights between the tribes. This treaty, agreed to in 1825, was facilitated by William Clark, of Lewis and Clark fame, and the surveying was completed by U.S. Deputy Surveyor Captain Nathan Boone, son of Daniel Boone.
Publication History
This map was published by Samuel Augustus Mitchell as page thirty-four in the 1846 edition of his A New Universal Atlas.

CartographerS


Samuel Augustus Mitchell (March 20, 1792 - December 20, 1868) began his map publishing career in the early 1830s. Having worked as a school teacher, Mitchell was frustrated with the low quality and inaccuracy of school texts of the period. His first maps were an attempt to rectify this problem. In the next 20 years Mitchell would become the most prominent American map publisher of the mid-19th century. Mitchell worked with prominent engravers J. H. Young, H. S. Tanner, and H. N. Burroughs before attaining the full copyright on his maps in 1847. In 1849 Mitchell either partnered with or sold his plates to Thomas, Cowperthwait and Company who continued to publish the Mitchell's Universal Atlas. By about 1856 most of the Mitchell plates and copyrights were acquired by Charles Desilver who continued to publish the maps, many with modified borders and color schemes, until Mitchell's son, Samuel Augustus Mitchell Junior, entered the picture. In 1859, S.A. Mitchell Jr. purchased most of the plates back from Desilver and introduced his own floral motif border. From 1860 on, he published his own editions of the New General Atlas. The younger Mitchell became as prominent as his father, publishing maps and atlases until 1887, when most of the copyrights were again sold and the Mitchell firm closed its doors for the final time. Learn More...


Edward L. Carey (April 7, 1805 - June 16, 1845) was an American publisher, aesthete, art lover, and the co-founder, along with Abraham Hart, of the prominent publishing firm Carey and Hart. Carey was the son of American publisher Mathew Carey and Bridget Flahaven Carey. He initially worked for his brother, Henry Charles Carey who, along with relative and partner Isaac Lea, purchased their father's publishing house in 1822, rebranding it as Carey and Lea. Eventually, Edward Carey became a junior partner in the firm, acquiring half of the shares belonging to Lea, and the imprint briefly changed to Carey, Lea, and Carey. On November 1, 1829, Edward Carey detached himself from his brother's firm and formed a partnership with Abraham Hart, an employee of Carey, Hart, and Carey. This firm, known as Carey and Hart, was successful for twenty-five years, publishing works by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, William Cullen Bryant, and Eliza Leslie. Carey suffered from declining health during the last three years of his life. According to William Gilmore Sims, Carey died 'after suffering for some years from a tedious affliction of the spine.' Carey died on June 16, 1845 at the age of 40. Before his death, he was elected President of the Academy of Fine Arts, but declined the position due to his health. Learn More...


Abraham Hart (December 15, 1810 - July 22, 1885) was an American publisher of Jewish-Dutch descent based in Philadelphia. As a boy, Hart became an employee of the publishing firm Carey, Lea, and Carey. In 1829, when Edward Carey left his older brother Mathew Carey's firm, Edward and Hart joined forces, forming Carey and Hart. This firm became very well-known and was successful for twenty-five years, publishing works by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, William Cullen Bryant, and Eliza Leslie. Hart married Rebecca Cohen Isaacks in 1831. Carey died at the age of 40 in 1845, but Hart continued the publishing firm until he retired in 1854, which marked the end of the Carey and Hart imprint. After retiring, Hart involved himself with industrial enterprises, and served both the Centennial Button-hole Machine Company and the American Button-hole Machine Company in an executive capacity. Hart was also an active member of the Jewish community in Philadelphia, serving for a time as president of the Jewish Congregation Mickvéh Israel, and assisting in Jewish educational and charitable enterprises. Learn More...

Source


Mitchell, S.A., A New Universal Atlas Containing Maps of the various Empires, Kindoms, States, and Republics of the World…(Philadelphia: Mitchell) 1846.     The New Universal Atlas is one of the great American atlases of the mid-19th century. Samuel Augustus Mitchell first issued the atlas in 1846 when he acquired the map plates and copyright for Tanner's New Universal Atlas from its publisher, Carey and Hart. The first transitional 1846 edition was published jointly with Carey and Hart, but a second edition was published in the same year with the Tanner imprint erased. This edition of the atlas also introduced the signature S. A. Mitchell green and pink color scheme. Most of the maps from the early editions of the atlas were engraved by H. N. Burroughs or C. S. Williams, often bearing their copyright. Burroughs maps also tended to have what map collector David Rumsey refers to as the 'Cary and Hart' borders, which featured a narrow vine motif. These borders were replaced, along with the Burroughs imprint, with the more traditional Mitchell strap work border used in the atlases until 1856. Mitchell published editions until late in 1850, when he sold the rights to Thomas, Cowperthwait and Company of Philadelphia. Under Cowperthwait, the atlases continued to be published and bear the Mitchell name until 1856, when it the plates were again sold, this time to Charles Desilver. Desilver reworked the plates with new border art and a revised color scheme in the style of J. H. Colton. Desilver issued editions from 1857 to 1860, when the atlas was phased out in favor of Samuel Augustus Mitchell Jr.'s New General Atlas.

Condition


Very good. Even overall toning. Blank on verso.