1745 Delamarche Map of the Holy Land, Israel, or Palestine

IsraelPalestine-delamarche-1745
$975.00
Carte de la terre des Hebreux ou Israelites partagee selon l'ordre de Dieu aux douze tribus descendantes des douze fils de Jacob…
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1745 Delamarche Map of the Holy Land, Israel, or Palestine

IsraelPalestine-delamarche-1745


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Title


Carte de la terre des Hebreux ou Israelites partagee selon l'ordre de Dieu aux douze tribus descendantes des douze fils de Jacob…
  1745 (undated)    19.5 x 27.5 in (49.53 x 69.85 cm)

Description


A fine example of Delamarche's exceptional 1745 map of the Holy Land, Israel, or Palestine. Details the region on both sides of the Jordan River with the Mediterranean shoreline running from Sidon to Raphia. The map depicts the region divided according to the Twelve Tribes of Israel. A smaller inset map in the upper left quadrant details the region as it was divided under the Israelite King Solomon. The lower left quadrant features an elaborate baroque title cartouches surmounted by a pyramid bearing the Hebrew characters for 'God.' To either side of the extensive title text are Moses, with the Tablets of the Law, and another patriarch, possible Abraham. Delamarche credits manuscript work by Nicholas Sanson as the source for both maps. This map was published both in Vaugondy's Atlas d'etude and G. De L'Isle and P. Buache's Atlas Geographique et Universel.

CartographerS


Charles Francois Delamarche (1740-1817) founded the important and prolific Paris based Maison Delamarche map publishing firm in the late 18th century. A lawyer by trade Delamarche entered the map business with the acquisition from Jean-Baptiste Fortin of Robert de Vaugondy's map plates and copyrights. Delamarche appears to have been of dubious moral character. In 1795 the widow of Didier Robert de Vaugondy Marie Louise Rosalie Dangy, petitioned a public committee for 1500 livres, which should have been awarded to her deceased husband. However, Delamarche, proclaiming himself Vaugondy's heir, filed a simultaneous petition and walked away with the funds most of which he was instructed to distribute to Vaugondy's widow and children. Just a few months later, however, Delamarche proclaimed Marie Dangy deceased and it is highly unlikely that any these funds found their way to Vaugondy's impoverished daughters. Nonetheless, where Vaugondy could not make ends meet as a geographer, Delamarche prospered as a map publisher, acquiring most of the work of earlier generation cartographers Lattre, Bonne, Desnos, and Janvier, thus expanding significantly upon the Vaugondy stock. Charles Delamarche eventually passed control of the firm to his son Felix Delamarche (18th C. - 1st half 19th C.) and geographer Charles Dien (1809-1870). It was later passed on to Alexandre Delamarche, who revised and reissued several Delamarche publications in the mid-19th century. The firm continued to publish maps and globes until the middle part of the 19th century.


Gilles (1688 - 1766) and Didier (c. 1723 - 1786) Robert de Vaugondy were map publishers, engravers, and cartographers active in Paris during the mid-18th century. The father and son team were the inheritors to the important Sanson cartographic firm whose stock supplied much of their initial material. Graduating from Sanson's map's Gilles, and more particularly Didier, began to produce their own substantial corpus of work. Vaugondys were well respected for the detail and accuracy of their maps in which they made excellent use of the considerable resources available in 18th century Paris to produce the most accurate and fantasy-free maps possible. The Vaugondys compiled each map based upon their own superior geographic knowledge, scholarly research, the journals of contemporary explorers and missionaries, and direct astronomical observation - moreover, unlike many cartographers of this period, they commonly took pains to reference their source material. Nevertheless, even in 18th century Paris geographical knowledge was severely limited - especially regarding those unexplored portions of the world, including the poles, the Pacific northwest of America, and the interior of Africa and South America. In these areas the Vaugondys, like their rivals De L'Isle and Buache, must be considered speculative geographers. Speculative geography was a genre of mapmaking that evolved in Europe, particularly Paris, in the middle to late 18th century. Cartographers in this genre would fill in unknown areas on their maps with speculations based upon their vast knowledge of cartography, personal geographical theories, and often dubious primary source material gathered by explorers and navigators. This approach, which attempted to use the known to validate the unknown, naturally engendered many rivalries. Vaugondy's feuds with other cartographers, most specifically Phillipe Buache, resulted in numerous conflicting papers being presented before the Academie des Sciences, of which both were members. The era of speculatively cartography effectively ended with the late 18th century explorations of Captain Cook, Jean Francois de Galaup de La Perouse, and George Vancouver.


Jean-Claude Dezauche (fl. c. 1780 - 1838) was a French map publisher active in Paris during the first half of the 19th century. Dezauche's business model focused on editing and republishing the earlier maps of Phillipe Buache and Guillaume de L'Isle, which he acquired from Buache's heir, Jean Nicholas Buache, in 1780. Like Bauche and Dezauche held a position with the Depot de la Marine and his name many of their maps. Jean-Claude Dezuache eventually passed his business to his son, Jean André Dezauche.

Source


Delisle, G., and Buache, P., Atlas Geographique et Universel, (Dezauche, Paris), 1789. Also in: Vaugondy, R. Atlas d'Etude, (Maison Delamarche, Paris) 1797.    

Condition


Very good condition. Original centerfold. Original platemark visible. Blank on verso. Wide clean margins. Old color.

References


Laor, E., Maps of the Holy Land: Cartobibliography of Printed Maps, 1475-1900, #673.