1897 Britton and Rey Map of Golden Gate Park, San Francisco

GoldenGatePark-brittonrey-1897
$2,000.00
Map showing the Golden Gate Park the Avenue and Buena Vista Park.
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1897 Britton and Rey Map of Golden Gate Park, San Francisco

GoldenGatePark-brittonrey-1897

Highlights the birds, deer, and bison living in Golden Gate Park.
$2,000.00

Title


Map showing the Golden Gate Park the Avenue and Buena Vista Park.
  1897 (dated)    10 x 54 in (25.4 x 137.16 cm)     1 : 4141

Description


This is an 1897 Joseph Britton and Jacques Joseph Rey map of Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, and depicts the park from the Pacific Ocean to Baker Street and from D Street to H Street and includes both the Panhandle and Buena Vista Park. Park improvements in the eastern third of the park are illustrated in detail, with the numerous buildings, monuments, and other areas all identified. One such attraction, the Deer Glen, has since been radically changed, but in 1897 it was home to deer, and also housed elk, ostrich, and even seals. The park was also home to an aviary and a bison (buffalo) paddock. After the San Francisco Zoo opened, most of the wildlife was moved there over a period of time, but the bison paddock has remained a part of the park's landscape, although today it is located farther to the west than it is here. Today, the San Francisco Botanical Garden is situated where the Arboretum is on the present map, and the nursery has moved further into the park to make way for Kezar Stadium.
Publication History and Census
This map was created and lithographed by Joseph Britton and Jacques Joseph Rey in 1897 for inclusion in the Board of Park Commissioners' Twenty-Sixth Annual Report of the Board of Park Commissioners of San Francisco, for the Year Ending June 30, 1897. Several editions of this map, many of which were updated, were published both before and after the present map. Editions are differentiated by color use - with most earlier editions exhibited only partial color - reflecting the compleatedness of the park. We are aware of no other examples of the 1897 edition.

CartographerS


Joseph Britton (1825 - July 18, 1901) was born in Yorkshire, England, and immigrated to the United States in 1835 with his family, living in New York City, becoming a lithographer by 1847. In 1849, he left New York to seek his fortune in California during the California Gold Rush. He made the journey with George Gordon’s ‘Gordon’s California Association’, and chose the voyage which included an overland trek via Nicaragua. The voyage was supposed to last 60 days, but instead lasted an incredible 8 months. After several unsuccessful years in various gold mining camps, Britton relocated to San Francisco and established a lithography firm, probably in 1851, and then entered into a short-lived collaboration with C.J. Pollard in 1852, named Pollard and Britton. By late 1852, Britton had formed a partnership with the lithographer Jacques Joseph Rey. Rey married Britton’s sister in 1855, but Britton remained a life-long bachelor and lived with the Rey family. Rey and Britton were well integrated into San Francisco. They owned a plumbing and gas-fitting firm, which apparently Rey managed. They also worked with several different lithographers off and on, but their partnership solidified by 1867. Britton was one of the three original investors in Andres Hallidie’s first San Francisco cable-car line on Clay Street and served twice as a San Francisco City and County Supervisor.


Jacques Joseph Rey (1820 - 1892) was born in Bouxwiller, Alsace, France, and apparently was trained in art and lithography. Around 1850, he immigrated to California. Rey, a lithographer by training, entered into a partnership with Joseph Britton (1825 - 1901) by late 1852. Rey married Britton’s sister in 1855, but Britton, who remained a life-long bachelor, lived with the newlyweds. Rey and Britton were well integrated into San Francisco. They owned a plumbing and gas-fitting firm, which apparently Rey managed. They also worked with several different lithographers off and on, but their partnership solidified by 1867. Following Rey’s death and Britton’s retirement, Rey’s son, Valentine J. A. Rey, took over the business and ran it at least until the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire.


Britton and Rey (1852 - 1906) was a lithographic firm based in San Francisco founded by Joseph Britton (1825 - 1901) and Jacques Joseph Rey (1820 - 1892). The leading firm in the area during the second half of the 19th century, Britton and Rey eventually earned the reputation of being the western Currier and Ives. They published both large-format and postcard views of California, as well as with stock certificates, stationery, and maps. Within the partnership, Rey was the artist and Britton the principal lithographer. Britton was also principally concerned with the business aspects of the firm. The firm also printed lithographs by other artists, including Thomas Almond Ayres (1816 - 1858), George Holbrook Baker (1824 - 1906), Charles Christian Nahl (1818 - 1878), and Frederick August Wenderoth (1819 - 1884). After Rey's death in 1892 and Britton's subsequent retirement, the firm passed to Rey's son, Valentine J. A. Rey, who ran the firm until at least the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. A. Carlisle and Company, another San Francisco printer, acquired the remains of the Britton and Rey firm in 1916. For more information about Joseph Britton and Jacques Joseph Rey, please reference their individual biographies included in our cartographer database.

Source


Board of Park Commissioners, Twenty-Sixth Annual Report of the Board of Park Commissioners of San Francisco, for the Year Ending June 30, 1897., (San Francisco: Brunt Press) 1897.    

Condition


Good. Verso repairs to fold separations and at fold intersections. Light wear along original fold lines. Light soiling. Blank on verso.
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