Johannis Van Keulen (1654 – 1715) was a Dutch cartographer active in Amsterdam during the late 17th century. Keulen was the son of Lucas van Keulen. Keulen's firm, β€˜In de Gekroonde Lootsman' (In the Crowned Pilot), was founded in 1678 and registered with the Amsterdam Bookseller's guild as 'Cross staff-maker and bookseller'. The cross-staff is a nautical instrument used to determine latitude. Two years later, in 1680, they obtained a patent from the States of Holland and West Friesland to publish nautical charts and atlases. Together with his partner, the cartographer Claes Janz Vooght, Van Keulen published numerous atlases and nautical charts, including the Zee Atlas and Nieuwe Lichtende Zee-Fakkel. This later work, the Zee-Fakkel, which in translation means 'Sea Torch', was a massive five volume atlas containing more than 130 nautical charts. The Zee-Fakkel established the Keulen firm as the pre-eminent maker of Dutch sea charts in the late 17th and early 18th century. Following Johannis Van Keulen death in 1715, his son, Gerard van Keulen (1678-1726) continued to update and republish the Zee-Fakkel until his own death in 1726. The firm was later passed on to Gerard's son, Johannes II von Keulen (1704-1755), who significantly updated the atlas, especially with regard to Asia. The final editions of the atlas were published by Gerlad Hulst van Keulen (1733-1801), Joannes II's son. The final edition of the Zee-Fakkel was published posthumously in 1803. It is noteworthy that though ostensibly controlled by the Van Keulen men, it was actually the widows of Keulens who maintained and managed the firm in the periods following their husbands' deaths.